Unquantifiable Returns

Corporate Social Responsibility or even sometimes referred as corporate citizenship is defined by Investopodia as a firm’s “initiatives to assess and take responsibility for the company’s effects on environmental and social wellbeing.”

My own definition of CSR, however, is slightly different. I see CSR as a means to provide more opportunities for families. This means working harder to encourage and support opportunities for education, entrepreneurship, and preservation of our natural resources. More so, when more than 25 percent of Filipinos live below the poverty line. In fact, the Philippines has the second highest poverty incidence in the Southeast Asia Region, next to Myanmar, according to the Asian Development Bank.

And it is the thought of helping others through my own endeavors is what, as cliché as it may sound, keeps me pushing harder for success in my business ventures. It was the same when I was with NAPOCOR and facing all the hardship of giving light (literally) to Filipinos. It was the thought that there are plenty who would benefit from the power projects we were putting together.

It is no different now that I am involved in renewable energy development. Our team in EPI reaches out to communities to understand how we can work together. As we build power plants, we are aware that we can make a difference in other people’s lives: we create value by providing them with employment and education.

EPI employs close to 400 individuals with our power plant projects. And on top of generating employment, we are also able to send both children and adults who wish to complete their education after quitting due to poverty.

One example is a 47-year-old Mangyan who recently graduated high school through our sponsored Alternative Learning System Program in Najuan. She, along with other 25 students graduated secondary education through our ALS.   At present, we have some 120 students in the programs who range 17 to 48 years of age.

It is important for us entrepreneurs and other members of the society to find ways to help our fellowmen go to school given that as of 2013, four out of every 10 Filipinos or four million youths are out of school. The Functional Literacy, Education and Mass Media Survey noted that roughly 19.2 percent of the survey participants said that their families could not afford to send the school expenses as the primary reason for quitting their education.

It has always pained me to see our fellow Filipino go abroad to find employment and have their children grow up without their parents’ care and for children to drop out of school to help their poor families. What’s even worse is when these workers end up taking care of other’s children while their own are being nurtured by others.  Our team takes pride that we can help keep families together through our own entrepreneurial initiatives.

Sure, bottom line figures are important for any businessman. But there are other created value through business undertakings that are equally important. Jobs generation that allows our head of families to provide a good future for their children without flying elsewhere and the opportunity to send individuals back to school after being denied of education in their early years top the list.

 

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