The New Age of Grids

The Philippines finally appreciates the value of smart grids.

For starters, the upcoming 200-hectare New Clark City (NCC) located in Clark’s special economic zone will boast of having the first completely smart power grid in the Philippines.  The NCC, after all, is designed to be the country’s first smart, sustainable and disaster-resilient city.

NCC’s owner, the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) already inked a deal with the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium to be the city’s power distributor. This, after the consortium, won the bidding with their proposed tariff bid of Php 0.6188 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The tariff rate is lower than the Php1.25 kWh tariff ceiling set by the BCDA for power distribution.  It is also cheaper than the Php1.24 kWh rate of Mactan Electric, the lowest distribution supply metering tariff under the traditional distribution system.

The smart city will have state-of-the-art facilities on par with other smart cities around the world.  The smart grid in the NCC is seen to have better reliability standards and will allow customers to access real-time information from the distribution utility. Distribution lines will be underground adding to the aesthetics of an environmental-friendly city.

Plus, just recently, the National Electrification Administration (NEA) has announced that it has piloted a smart grid technology aimed at improving the reliability of a Batangas electric cooperative’s distribution system with the help of the Japan International Cooperation Agency. The technology to be used in this pilot is the Distribution Automation System that is expected to improve the distribution system reliability as well as lessen the duration of a power outage. These are all thanks to automation.

NEA says the smart grid technology will hopefully do wonders for the operational efficiency, particularly the reliability of the cooperatives’ system reliability.

Indeed, smart grids are now making their way to the Philippines. And why not when there are so many advantages in investing in modernizing our power distribution system?

For one, smart girds, unlike the traditional grids allows for two-way communication of electricity data thus providing real-time data collection on the power demand and supply during the transmission and distribution.  This means that the electrical grid can respond quickly to changes in the power demand, thanks to the grid’s controls, automation, computation, and equipment. The said cannot be said of the traditional grid that has a one-way interaction during generation and consumption.

smart-grid-Borg-2

Smart grids empowers consumers by providing real-time data on power demand and supply. Photo c/o telecomdrive.com

 

Smart grids also empower consumers by providing them with information on when the power demand is at its lowest or highest. This information allows them to schedule high energy-consuming activities such as ironing or running the washing machine when electricity costs are lowest. Plus, smart grid coverage lets consumers purchase their electricity straight from retail suppliers.

Another benefit of smart grids is its ability to integrate renewable energy into the system.

In the case of the NCC, the BCDA plans to integrate embedded generation that has renewable energy as its primary power source. The city can also source its power from rooftop solar PVs, waste-to-energy and natural gas, among others.

Clearly,  modernizing our power system with the help of smart grids is a great way to move forward. But, of course, regulations must also be updated as we shift to the smart grid.

Currently, the Philippines has no rules concerning smart grids. The Department of Energy has said that a roadmap for smart grids in the country is underway and will be released by the third quarter of this year in the form of a department circular.

Hopefully, this roadmap will be able to address issues regarding the use of smart grids such as smart meter, real-time dynamic pricing, and grid cybersecurity, to name a few. May it will pave the way for the proliferation of smart grids so that Filipino consumers can take advantage of such technological advancements.

Finally, let me say that the advent of smart grids will lead to the integration of ICT and power systems. This will lead further to the development of data centers nationwide, increase in the number of internet exchange servers, and eventually bring down the cost of both power and telecommunication services. The distribution grids that can adapt to these developments will be those that have the 21st technologies at their disposal. This will indeed help spur the development of the country. As I said, however, only competition in the distribution sector can speed this up.

Isn’t It Ironic?

ocean

Record-breaking year for ocean temperatures in 2018. Photo c/o Business Insider

Germany recently made an announcement that it will end its dependence on coal power plants by 2038 in an effort to meet its commitment to the Paris climate change goals. Reports noted that the country intends to reduce its coal energy capacity from 42.6 gigawatts (GW) to around 30 GW in 2020 and to 17 GW by 2030.

Germany at present still sources 40 percent of its power needs from coal. Last year was a first for the country as renewable energy dominated the power mix.

Hans Joachim Schellnhuber a member German coal exit commission hailed the decision as a move that’s very much needed in this day and age “ This is an important step on the road to the post-fossil age – a step that also opens up new perspectives for the affected regions through innovation-driven structural change.”

And I agree that the move is a step in the right direction. Each country needs to make drastic actions to help keep the world’s temperature at the desired levels. After all, the United Nations recently warned us that we only have 12 years to keep the world’s temperature to a maximum of 1.5 °C. Otherwise, we will suffer from worsening of risks of floods, extreme heat, droughts, and poverty.

We are already, of course, seeing the effects of climate change.

For example, as early as November last year, experts have warned that 2018 was likely to be the fourth hottest year on record. There is no confirmation of this record as of now. But what has been confirmed is that 2018 is that ocean’s had their warmest year on record.

The study that was published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences noted that the hot record indicates the enormous amount of heat is being absorbed by the sea due to rising of greenhouse gas emission. Rising ocean temperatures are not to be ignored says, experts, since they contribute to intense hurricanes and destruction of coral reefs.

Plus, the world is likely to suffer from El Nino this year, which will make 2019 as most likely to be the hottest year on record according to the Climate Prediction Center.

These warnings, of course, are pushing many countries, like Germany to step up their fight against dirty sources of power and honor their commitment to the Paris agreement in 2015.

The Philippines, unlike Germany and other countries, are far from making waves when it comes to greater use of renewable. This is a pity since we Filipinos have more reasons to shift to renewable power.

For starters, we are a country that is endowed with plenty of natural resources. We are just the third biggest geothermal power producer in the world. The Philippines used to be second, but sadly was overtaken by Indonesia (which merits a separate article). We are also a tropical country as well. Yet here, we are a nation that has coal plants as the major source of energy.

It also makes sense for us to do our share to help the earth limit its global warming. The Philippines, after all, has been tagged as one of the most vulnerable nations to climate change. But we are a country that has pushed back its target of sourcing 35 percent of overall energy needs by 2030 to 2040.

Plus, there’s a clamor renewable power among Filipinos. A survey by Pulse Asia last year showed that 89 percent of Filipinos are in favor of renewable energy. But alas, the country will be adding some. 10,423 MW of coal power.

We have every reason to shift to renewable energy. We have the natural resources. We are a country that suffers greatly from the effects of climate change. Our citizens want cleaner forms of energy. But no, we remain a nation dependent on coal. How ironic. And sad.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/business/2018/12/26/1879827/iemop-proposes-nationwide-system-renewable-energy-development

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/2019-may-be-the-warmest-year-on-record-as-a-result-of-an-el-nino-event-exacerbated-by-global-warming/70006943

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/16/world/climate-2018-hottest-year-for-ocean/index.html

Good and Sad Headlines

 

re germany

Renewable Energy dominated the power mix of Germany in 2018. Photo c/o Time.com

The New Year started with news of record highs for the renewable energy sector.

In Germany, renewable energy dominated the power mix for 2018. A study by Bruno Burger of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems showed that Germany is on its way to becoming less dependent on fossil fuel as renewable energy accounted for 40 percent of the country’s electricity production in 2018 while 38 percent came from coal. This is the first time renewables has overtaken coal as Germany’s primary power source. Wind power also became the second biggest power source.

Similarly, a  new record high in renewable energy use was also recorded last year by the United Kingdom (UK).

According to climate research and news site, Carbon Brief, growth in renewable energy use in the UK rose to 33 percent, a record-breaking figure. On the other hand, fossil fuel use dropped to 46 percent, the lowest ever recorded as many coal power plant closed last year. The UK has earlier pledged to phase out all coal plants by 2025.

These two countries’ achievements only show that indeed a shift to cleaner forms of energy is possible.

Unfortunately, the Philippines has not been making headlines for its use of renewable power.

On the contrary, recent headlines about the energy sector talks about the increase in power rates due to the second tranche of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion or TRAIN law.

The second installment of the law equals an additional excise tax of Php2.00 per liter of diesel and gasoline an added 12 percent value for 2019. The total increase per liter of diesel will be Php2.24. Last year, Php 2.50 taxes were levied on diesel and bunker fuel.

Naturally, the new taxes will have a domino effect on consumer prices, transport fares, and yes, power rates.

No, I am not questioning the merits of our new taxation scheme. I leave that to tax experts and economists. What I am merely pointing out is that the new taxes also increase power rates because of the Philippines’ dependence on traditional sources of power.

Estimates by The Independent Electricity Market Operator of the Philippines (IEMOP) show that the second tranche of TRAIN law will raise electricity prices by P0.1111 per kilowatt hour (kWh). By 2020 or on the third installment, the increase would be P0.1311 per kWh. The first phase already raised electricity prices by P0.0904 per kWh. These estimates according to IEMOP are based on the assumptions of Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) related to its sourcing energy mix.

Naturally, the power rates will increase if fuel prices in the world market increase, too. In the words of IEMOP President Francis Saturnino Juan, “So, these are the incremental amounts, but of course if the price of fuel itself will increase, then that will add to this incremental increase in 2019 and 2020 because of the staggered increase in the implementation of the law,” he said.

The issue of increasing power prices is a separate one from that of volatility. Volatility itself causes over-all costs to rise because of uncertainty. Because we are dependent on global markets, necessarily we are exposed to global price swings.

We could have spared the Filipinos from this additional burden if we increased the share of renewable power in our power mix a long time ago. Why pay more for expensive sources of energy when we could have just harnessed our natural resources well? This is especially true for off-grid islands that are powered on diesel-fired generators. We have to keep in mind that 80 percent of the operating cost of power generation in isolated islands are spent on diesel. And with added taxes on petroleum products, we can expect higher prices of power generation for the off-grid areas.

That’s just the problem with our reliance on traditional sources of energy and the government’s lack of appreciation for renewables — it leaves Filipinos vulnerable to a variety of factors. Sadly, it is the consumers that suffer when there is no political will to push for a greater share of renewable energy.

References:

https://businessmirror.com.ph/after-hurdling-2018s-regulatory-crisis-power-industry-players-are-ready-for-year-of-the-pig/

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/renewable-energy-germany-coal-power-environment-green-solar-wind-a8711176.html

https://www.ft.com/content/ea2feb40-0e8e-11e9-a3aa-118c761d2745

Survey Says

The majority of Filipinos are dissatisfied with current power prices according to a survey by Pulse Asia.

Last August, the research firm released its report revealing that around 60 percent of Filipinos are dissatisfied with the power rates. “With the exception of Mindanao, at least half of adults in the main geographic areas are dissatisfied with the price of their electricity,” Pulse Asia said.

The survey also showed that a significant majority of Filipinos or 82 percent are in favor of “having a new option for electric service provider or electric utility.” In the National Capital Region (NCR), 88 percent of adult Filipinos expressed openness to having new electric service providers. Plus, 89 percent of Filipinos also favor renewable energy.

The survey results are a testament to the growing dissatisfaction of Filipinos on our high power rates. They are also aware that there is a need for more competition in our energy sector even in the distribution segment to cut the cost of electricity. Competition, after all, will always drive down market prices. And it is not surprising that the vast majority of the survey participant for NCR is open for more distributors as the monopoly of a company in any business will never be beneficial for consumers.

Unfortunately, the passage of the Electric Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA) did little to invite competition in the markets in the distribution side as we focused more on having more players in the generation business.

But there are steps our regulators can take to generate more players in the distribution of power. For one, we can break away from the current practice of disallowing a new distribution entity to enter the market where one DU is in place. Such practice fails to promote competition and instead allows for a monopoly to flourish.

Aside from allowing other power players to enter an already franchised service area, our regulators should also consider lifting the cap for the Retail Competition and Open Access (RCOA).

Currently, the rule says that only those with a monthly peak demand of 750 kilowatts or higher can be considered contestable customers and can choose their preferred service providers. In my opinion, this rule should be revised as anyone regardless of their power consumption should be given the option to decide where to source their power.

We have to keep in mind that contestable customers get to save on their energy bills than the captive customers or those who are required to source from their distribution utilities or electric cooperatives. In a column in BusinessWorld, President of Minimal Government Thinkers, Bienvenido S. Oplas, Jr. President of Minimal Government Thinkers notes that contestable customers on average only pay Php 6.91 per kilowatt hour (kWh) considerably lower than the captive customers who pay roughly Php 7.78 kWh.

Our government then should work on giving choices to the majority of the Filipinos by allowing them to choose their power generator or distributor rather than force them to stay with their current ones. Naturally, aside from lifting the restriction on RCOA, there is also a need to make the infrastructure and resources available to pave the way for this scenario where customers have the freedom to choose their energy type, generator, and even distributor.

DU competition

Technology will soon render the traditional distribution system obsolete according to experts. Photo c/o https://m.dailyhunt.in

We have to make these changes if we do not want to be left behind. Let us keep in mind that the technological advancements will soon render the traditional distribution system obsolete as asserted by many experts. For example, David Cane, former CEO of NRG Energy believes that the existing utility system will become irrelevant in the near future since many advanced countries are moving towards decentralized homegrown energy where home automation be of great importance. He argues that “When we think of who our competitors or partners will be, it will be the Googles, Comcasts, AT&Ts who are already inside the meter.”

Indeed, we need to create an environment that can accommodate these technologies, so we can benefit from having more options as well as cheaper power prices to consumers.

Having choices is one of the best ways to promote competition and hence lower down the power costs in the country. However, major changes are needed that require a lot of willpower. It is time for our regulators to put the interest of the Filipino consumers above anything else.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/08/21/1844441/filipinos-not-satisfied-high-power-rates-poll

https://www.bworldonline.com/electricity-competition-epira-and-wesm/

A Timely Reminder

Three years ago, Pope Francis made a strong appeal to the world to address the growing problem of climate change. In his 180-page encyclical, the pope stressed that “Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods. It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day.”

Pope Francis recently made the same appeal with investors, oil executives and Vatican experts during an unprecedented conference at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

The pontiff had stressed that climate change must be addressed soon and the world has to use a power mix that will combat pollution, promote social justice, and combat pollution. “But that energy should also be clean, by a reduction in the systematic use of fossil fuels. Our desire to ensure energy for all must not lead to the undesired effect of a spiral of extreme climate changes due to a catastrophic rise in global temperatures, harsher environments and increased levels of poverty,” the pope said.

He reminded his audience that development must not come at the expense of the environment “Civilisation requires energy, but energy use must not destroy civilisation.”

The head of the Catholic Church has never wavered in his appeal to the world to make the planet a better place by saving the environment. His recent plea is also timely as studies and reports show that the world has to do more in fighting the effects of climate change.

The recent United Nation (UN), a yearly report entitled ‘The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2018” concluded that climate change along with inequality and conflict are the primary factors in growing hunger and displacement around the world.

The figures in the report showed that the world has a long way to go in combating the effects of climate change including the health hazards. After all, the World Health Organization once tagged climate change as “the defining issue for the 21st century.”

The UN study revealed that in 2016, around the world, 91 percent of the urban population were breathing dirty air or air that failed to meet the WHO Air Quality Guidelines. What’s worse is that more than half of the said population were exposed to air pollution levels that are at least 2.5 times higher than the safety standard. It is not surprising then that around 4.2 million people died due to high levels of ambient air pollution.

The same report showed that renewable power’s share in the final energy consumption had a moderate increase from 17.3 percent in 2014 to only 17.5 percent in 2015.

That’s a sad figure, especially when the more significant use of renewable energy can save lives. Let us remember that both coal and oil power have greater death prints, or what energy expert James Conca defines as the “number of people killed by one kind of energy or another per kilowatt hour (kWh) produced.”

In fact, the mortality rate of coal, which is derived by dividing the trillion kilowatt hour of use, is 100,000 when we get 50 percent or our energy needs from this source. Likewise, oil has a mortality rate of 36,000 for every eight percent of the energy it supplies.

Apparently, the growth of renewables in the world’s energy mix had been slow and more people are literally dying because of it. Clearly, more must be done to combat climate change, which includes developing and using more cleaner forms of energy.

Let us heed the Pope’s call, shall we?

References:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/09/pope-francis-tells-oil-bosses-world-must-wean-itself-off-fossil-fuels

http://sdg.iisd.org/news/sdg-report-2018-finds-conflict-climate-change-inequality-hindering-progress/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2012/06/10/energys-deathprint-a-price-always-paid/#16e2ea1b709b

 

 

 

 

UTILITIES OF THE 21st CENTURY Introducing Competition in the Power Distribution Sector

Around the world, changes in the energy sector, particularly in the distribution segment are taking place given technological advancements as well as the world’s worry over climate change

For example, in the United States, utilities are beginning to take the threats of climate change more seriously. New York’s Reforming the Energy Vision, a plan to “rebuild, strengthen, and modernize New York’s energy system” was initiated in 2014 partly because of the devastation brought by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. This is the most comprehensive utility proceeding today with its main idea of changing the utility model so that third party service providers can come in to serve the utility’s customers by moving away from the traditional utility model and going towards a Distribution System Platform (DSP) provider

The DSP model transforms the traditional utility into something like an air traffic controller that coordinates and facilitates the deployment of distributed energy resources (DERs). This becomes the focus of the utility, which is a far cry from the traditional concept of a monopoly. The staff of the Public Service Commission (PSC) stressed that “Under the customer-oriented regulatory reform envisioned here, a wide range of distributed energy resources will be coordinated to manage load, optimize system operations, and enable clean distributed power generation.”  The primary goal of this model is to make the utility customer-centric as “Markets and tariffs will empower customers to optimize their energy usage and reduce electric bills, while stimulating innovation and new products that will further enhance customer opportunities.”

This bold move by the New York City should not surprise us since electricity experts point out that significant transformations are causing a revolution in the way electricity is produced, distributed, and marketed. They stress that technology is giving consumers more autonomy and choice. These experts argue that we “have entered an age in which the technology-powered push and the customer-driven pull have beneficially collided.

In fact, as early as 2000, the United Kingdom (UK), already started introducing competition in the power distribution business through the Independent Connection Providers (ICPs) and licensed Independent Network Operators (DNOs), thus allowing customers to use an alternative provider for some connections work known as “contestable work.” These include but are not limited to, designing, purchasing materials to form the connection, reinforcement of the connection, and even directly connecting to the network. These tasks can be done by an Independent Connections Provider (ICP).

Indeed, change in the energy sector has already arrived where the customer’s choice has become the paramount objective of industry players by making room for more competition in the power distribution trade. The services at the retail level become less integrated by letting the customers choose his/her source of power, battery storage, Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) energy efficiency systems, and other similar value services.

The innovation will come from the ability of technology to combine customer data to Smart grids, microgrids, local generation, and storage, among others. Experts assert that the primary distribution channel for services will be online and the energy retailing price will hinge on innovative digital platforms.  In their view, these are the developments and trends that are coming and they will be coming soon.

For David Cane, former CEO of NRG Energy, the confluence of green energy and computer technology, deregulation, cheaper natural gas, and political pressure, is threatening the existing utility system. His opinion is that the grid will increasingly become irrelevant as customers move towards decentralized homegrown energy. Home automation will become king. Crane further argues that “When we think of who our competitors or partners will be, it will be the Googles, Comcasts, AT&Ts who are already inside the meter.”

Given all these developments, it, therefore, no longer inconceivable to think of two, or even more distribution utilities in one geographical area in the Philippines. These utilities need not perform the same functions.  As distribution services have been unbundled, e.g., metering as separate business units, distribution utilities can compete on which among them can connect the fastest and cheapest to the distribution grid.

It is no longer impossible to have two, or even more distribution utilities in one geographical area in the Philippines

The utilities can also compete on how much each supports home automation or distributed generation like rooftop solars. As pointed out recently by Google’s Chief Technology Advocate, Michael T. Jones, companies like Google can develop the service where “all electronic devices (to) talk about their power needs to an aggregator, and you can have a power auction for each one.”

Technology is now available to connect reading and billing of meters to bills payment through the mobile phone.  All these services have developed because of technology.

Even in constructing power grids in the distribution sector, one can have overhead wires, or underground ones, depending on the requirements or needs of the customers. Smart transformers connected to a Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) platforms can fine tune the needs of customers.

Unfortunately, unless competition is introduced in the Philippines distribution sector, it will take a long time for the Filipino consumers to enjoy the benefits of the 21st Century.  The distribution sector has long been in the abyss of lethargy induced by a monopolistic structure, running counter to the cornerstone of Energy Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA), which was crafted to introduce competition within the power sector. In particular, a guiding principle of the Distribution Sector is that it is a business affected with public interest. This objective of competition and guided by the principle of public interest required the unbundling of business activities as provided in Rule 10 of the Implementing Rules and Regulation (IRR) of the EPIRA.

It has traditionally been thought that because of the nature of the distribution business, this sector, and the Transmission Business, are natural monopolies. This was probably true in the past, but technologies have developed over the past few years thus making this view no longer true. As argued above, technological change has brought in innovation, creativity, and access to the masses. It has also brought down costs – the mobile business is a clear example. It is not, therefore, a theoretical argument that technology will bring down cost. That is a fact.

We cannot reach the goal of empowering the Filipino power consumer unless change comes in now. Distribution utilities’ vision should always be proactive and aligned with the varying needs and load profile of a dynamic consumer.  This may be reflected in the flexible design of a distribution system that instantaneously addresses the power demands and delivers the preferred sources of power to the customers. A sophisticated consumer-centric designed system encourages the proper management of electricity usage, which translates into savings on prices and resources.

To illustrate this point, let us take the case of a distribution utility and how it handles system loss. Currently, the task of managing systems loss at almost 20% seems like an insurmountable challenge. However, the introduction of smart meters and automated billing and payment systems can bring this down to a more manageable level at about 14% thus bringing down rates for the consumers, which translates into savings of about PHP 0.15/kWh. And this is just the initial and rough calculation.

The above is just an example how a much better equipped, and better-financed utility can bring down costs of the electricity consumer. In the medium term, replacement of aging wooden poles and overworked transformers will further push down systems loss and thus power rates. Finally, because of a strong balance sheet and excellent knowledge of the power market, the cost of generation can also be brought down.

Plus, competition is always beneficial for consumers because more players in the market will always result in cheaper goods and services.  Hence, consumers should be able to choose between service providers like distribution companies so that distribution companies can no longer just “pass on” any cost that they think they are traditionally entitled. While the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) will approve the rates, ultimately it will be the consumer who will choose.

Opening up our distribution system for more competition will also pave the way for more use of cleaner forms of energy. It would be ideal to have distribution companies who will have intelligent systems to accommodate renewable energy sources. Such a move will then give the consumers a choice to go for greener forms of power and help us in our goal of saving our environment. After all, making our power grids responsive to climate change will be another area of transformation and competition.  With typhoons becoming an even more frequent phenomenon in the country and elsewhere in the world, change has to come in designing, building and managing power distribution networks.

Making drastic changes in the way we distribute our energy locally is a win-win solution for all of us. We give consumers autonomy and more choices, we lower our electricity bills, and we help save our environment by paving the way for more RE use.

Indeed, significant changes are needed. And we need them soon.

References:

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, https://ilsr.org/u-s-power-grids-days-numbered/

https://www.utilitydive.com/news/are-recent-disasters-enough-to-spur-utilities-to-take-climate-change-seriou/517373/

https://www.utilitydive.com/news/rev-in-2016-the-year-that-could-transform-utility-business-models-in-new-y/412410/

Schwieter, N, and Flaherty T., “A Strategist’s Guide to Power Industry Transformation,” https://www.strategy-business.com/article/00355?gko=9fa18

 

 

Getting Closer to The Tipping Point

There have been various predictions on how and when renewable energy will soon displace coal as the most economical choice for the world’s power needs.

Just recently, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Michael Liebrich founder joined energy experts in saying that the time for renewables to take over will soon come. He estimated that renewable energy would gather roughly 86 percent of some $10.2 trillion investments in power generation by the year 2040.

His predictions do not end there. Liebrich further identified two tipping points that will push coal prices and natural gas to become unattractive.

 The first tipping point is “when new wind and solar become cheaper than anything else,” Liebreich said. And this may happen soon. He predicts that it will start by 2025 when it is cheaper to build a Solar PV plant than a coal-powered plant in Japan. Similarly, construction of wind power plants will be less expensive than building coal plants in India by the year 2030.

 The second tipping point, he says, is when operating the present coal and gas plants becomes more expensive than getting energy from wind and solar. This tipping point may take longer than the first and may happen first in Germany and China sometime between 2030 to 2040.

With all these forecasts or predictions, there is no denying that renewables will be the most economical source of energy all over the world.

 It is then crucial for us to seriously consider capitalizing on the price drops of these RE technologies and move fast in transitioning to heavy dependence on coal to renewable energy.

 Aside from being the cleaner form of energy, it is also essential for us to shift to RE because continued dependence on coal and other forms of fossil-fuel will hurt the pockets of our power consumers badly in the future.

 The above predictions only say that RE will be the cheapest option due to the declining cost of RE technology. However, there is another reason why coal will be more expensive for us Filipinos.

 As renewables take over, we can expect that coal and other similar fossil-based technologies will find it hard to acquire financing for their projects. With the growing clamor for greener technologies, it is likely that financial institutions will institute policies that avoid fuel technologies. Plus, of course, the declining costs of RE will make coal less competitive thus, pushing banks to lend–assuming they will– at significantly shorter maturity. The natural consequence is higher annuities. So, it is safe to say that around the world the cost of coal and other fossil fuels would sky-rocket.

We have to keep in mind that the Philippines only produces low-quality coal and our coal-fired plants are constructed for imported coal. In fact, in 2016, the Philippines imported a total of 20.79 million tons of coal, which is 47.8 percent higher than the imported figure in 2015. And a nation that depends heavily on imported coal will surely suffer from expensive power rates in the years to come as coal becomes more expensive in the world market.

 It is indeed time for our regulators and policy-makers to see the writing on the wall. Coal will be more expensive in the future, and our power consumers will pay much higher if we don’t shift our allegiance to RE.

 Our regulars have to act now. Otherwise, we will be paying more for our energy consumption, when in fact, cheaper energy has been abundant and available for us for a long time.

 Reference:

 https://www.rappler.com/views/imho/172064-sun-setting-coal

 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-19/tipping-point-seen-for-clean-energy-as-monster-turbines-arrive