Record Breaking 2018

It’s official: 2018 was the fourth warmest year on record for global temperatures. This is according to various organizations such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the World Meteorological Organization. (WMO). The global average temperature in 2018 is the fourth warmest since 1880 which is just behind years 2016,2017 and 2015.

According to reports, the world was 1.5 Fahrenheit or 0.83 Celsius warmer in 2018 than the average set between years 1951 to 1980.

Naturally, experts are alarmed at the rising global temperature trend as it reflects the effects of climate change. The 20 warmest years on record have been in the past 22 years. The degree of warming during the past four years has been exceptional, both on land and in the ocean,” said Petteri Taalas, secretary general of the WMO.  “Many of the extreme weather events are consistent with what we expect from a changing climate…This is a reality we need to face up to. Greenhouse gas emission reduction and climate adaptation measures should be a top global priority,” he added.

Fortunately, there are serious efforts from many countries and even the private sector to meet commitments to the Paris Climate Change Agreement in 2015 where leaders agreed to limit global warming to just under two degrees. Various countries and big global firms are in the last three years are working hard to cut down on human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide by shifting to renewable power.

In fact, 2018 was record-breaking too for corporate renewable energy deals.  According to  Business Renewables Center of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), the United States renewables market has almost doubled its figure of corporate off-site deals since 2015.

The contracted capacity for renewables by private firms in the US amounted to 6.43 GW last year. Corporate renewable energy buying came in the form of green power purchases, power purchase agreements, outright project ownership, and green tariffs. 

 

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2018 was the fourth hottest year on record. Photo c/o http://www.mysinchew.com/

Corporate giants AT&T, Facebook, Walmart, Microsoft, and ExxonMobil are the top five firms leading the clean energy purchase. Facebook, the biggest buyer last year closed several deals that amounted to 1,8495 megawatts. And the social media giant is proud of its accomplishment.Facebook is proud to contribute to the record-breaking year of corporate renewable energy deals. We believe companies can and should set big commitments to drive our national transition to a clean energy future,” stressed Rachel Peterson, vice president of data center strategy at Facebook. 

The impressive figures from global brands only show that large firms are serious about their commitment to a sustainable and clean future according to the CEO of RMI Jules Kortenhorst. These companies are not  going to wait for public policy on climate issues to catch up,“ they are taking the initiative to accelerate toward a prosperous, low-carbon economy, he added.

Clean energy investments worldwide in 2018 was also remarkable. The Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) noted that investments in clean power last year amounted to $332.1 billion. The figure is eight percent lower than the amount recorded in 2017, but BNEF notes that 2018 was the fifth consecutive year that the investment exceeded the $300 billion mark.

China and the US were the two biggest investing countries with investments of $100.1 billion and $64.2 billion, respectively.

Other countries also recorded high increases in their clean energy investments. The Netherlands, for example, had a 60 percent increase in RE investments at $5.6 billion while South Korea’s jump was at 74 percent with investments worth $5 billion. Even our neighbor, Vietnam had impressive 18-fold growth in clean power investments last year.

It’s not surprising of course that the Philippines is not in the list of countries that saw major increases in renewable energy investments. As I have been saying, our regulatory environment and lack of government support for clean power hamper the growth of renewable power development in the country. Nevertheless, as a clean and sustainable power advocate, it’s gratifying to see that global brands and governments understand clearly the value of renewable power. After all, renewable energy is a sustainable business practice that also helps the world combat climate change. And as I have expounded repeatedly, it will lower power cost for everyone.

When will change come to the Philippines?

References:

https://solarindustrymag.com/report-2018-a-record-breaking-year-for-corporate-renewable-energy-deals/

https://about.bnef.com/blog/clean-energy-investment-exceeded-300-billion-2018

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/06/global-temperatures-2018-record-climate-change-global-warming

From Second To Third: How PH Dropped To 3rd Place in Geothermal Power Production

The Philippines was once the second largest producer of geothermal power in the world. Sadly, this is no longer true.

Last year, the Mineral Resources Industry of Indonesia announced that its country’s geothermal power production has reached 1,800 megawatts (MW), making the country the second largest geothermal power producer. The Philippines, on the other hand, production has decreased from 1850 MW to 1600. We now just rank third.

There are many reasons for our country’s lower geothermal power production. And we need to look at the history of geothermal power development in the country to understand how we got to our current state.

In the early 1970s, the government had a partnership with Union Oil Company of California, or Unocal, now known as Chevron. Under this partnership, the Unocal will provide technical expertise while the Philippine government, through the National Power Corporation on NPC will build and operate the geothermal plants. In 1976, the government decided to do away with the private sector and build and do the exploration with Philippine National Oil Corporation-Exploration Development Corporation (PNOC-EDC) as the head agency.

At the height of the power crisis in the 1990s, the National Power Corporation signed an agreement with PNOC-EDC, then a government corporation, to develop and provide 700 MW of geothermal power in Leyte. This move catapulted the Philippines to the second largest producer of geothermal power in the world. We were second only to the US.

The Electric Power Industry Reform Act or EPIRA was a game changer for the energy sector. With the passage of this law, geothermal power exploration and development was left to the hands of the private sector. This means that the private sector has to spend for the exploration of possible geothermal sources and build the power plants, which are expensive. Exploration expenses cost more than half of the total project cost for geothermal power plant projects. And test drilling just a single hole can cost some $5 million as it is the most costly phase of the exploration. It is the private firm that assumes the cost and risk of the exploration activities.

The high capital needed for greenfield exploration is one of the reasons why most private entities stay away from geothermal power development. There was a time when the government shouldered the cost of the preliminary survey of the areas, but this is now being assumed by the private sector developer.

Unfortunately, our regulations do not help in making geothermal exploration and development enticing to investors. On the contrary, our regulators have little appreciation for the risks being taken by geothermal developers in our tariff setting.

geo

I have talked about this greatly in a separate post. But to put it simply, we use the BETA in the computation of the cost of equity under the Capital Asset Pricing Model or CAPM for our tariff setting. The Beta in the tariff equation determines the return on equity for any project. And sadly, the Energy Regulatory Commission uses the same Beta of ~1.03 for all power plant project regardless of technology. This means that the ERC does not consider the risk profile of the power plant project. This is an incorrect application of the CAPM and sadly puts geothermal power developers at a disadvantage since they assume the high-risks of the exploration but will not be properly compensated for it.

Why the ERC insists on using the same Beta for all power projects is mind- boggling especially since it has long been established that geothermal development is a high-risk undertaking. A study conducted by the International Finance Corporation years ago concluded that only 60 percent of the explored holes during geothermal exploration worldwide turned out to be successful.

The ERC’s attitude towards geothermal energy is just one of the regulatory issues that renewable energy advocates and developers have to contend with. Overall, previous administrations have paid little attention to renewable energy development anyway. Unfortunately, the lack of opportunities in this field has also lead geothermal energy experts to find work in other countries such as Indonesia.

It is no wonder why many local investors are not too keen to get into geothermal development in the Philippines. It also does not help that our constitution prevents us from getting more foreign investors to help us develop our natural resources.

It’s sad that a country like ours is missing the missing out on the benefits of geothermal power. The Philippines also has a great advantage in geothermal since we are located in the ring of fire and has many volcanic areas where geothermal resources are abundant. In fact, some studies show that the Philippines 2,047 MW of proven reserves and 4,790 MW of potential reserves.

We have to keep in mind that geothermal energy can act as a base load plant, which makes it a great substitute for traditional sources of power. And if we can just use geothermal power to replace coal, then we can surely enjoy cheaper power rates. Geothermal energy, as well as any other renewable power technologies, have a fixed price as I have discussed previously. This means Filipinos will no longer have to pay for the fluctuating cost of international coal prices and foreign exchange rates.

The Philippines’ drop to third place in geothermal energy production worldwide only shows that the lack of government support for renewable energy development has dire consequences. It may be a pity that we now rank lower than our neighbor. But what’s worse is that our country is failing to harness its rich natural resources properly for the benefit of the Filipino consumers.

References:

https://www.pwc.com/id/en/media-centre/infrastructure-news/infrastructure-news—archive/december-2017/indonesia-second-biggest-geothermal.html

Isn’t It Ironic?

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Record-breaking year for ocean temperatures in 2018. Photo c/o Business Insider

Germany recently made an announcement that it will end its dependence on coal power plants by 2038 in an effort to meet its commitment to the Paris climate change goals. Reports noted that the country intends to reduce its coal energy capacity from 42.6 gigawatts (GW) to around 30 GW in 2020 and to 17 GW by 2030.

Germany at present still sources 40 percent of its power needs from coal. Last year was a first for the country as renewable energy dominated the power mix.

Hans Joachim Schellnhuber a member German coal exit commission hailed the decision as a move that’s very much needed in this day and age “ This is an important step on the road to the post-fossil age – a step that also opens up new perspectives for the affected regions through innovation-driven structural change.”

And I agree that the move is a step in the right direction. Each country needs to make drastic actions to help keep the world’s temperature at the desired levels. After all, the United Nations recently warned us that we only have 12 years to keep the world’s temperature to a maximum of 1.5 °C. Otherwise, we will suffer from worsening of risks of floods, extreme heat, droughts, and poverty.

We are already, of course, seeing the effects of climate change.

For example, as early as November last year, experts have warned that 2018 was likely to be the fourth hottest year on record. There is no confirmation of this record as of now. But what has been confirmed is that 2018 is that ocean’s had their warmest year on record.

The study that was published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences noted that the hot record indicates the enormous amount of heat is being absorbed by the sea due to rising of greenhouse gas emission. Rising ocean temperatures are not to be ignored says, experts, since they contribute to intense hurricanes and destruction of coral reefs.

Plus, the world is likely to suffer from El Nino this year, which will make 2019 as most likely to be the hottest year on record according to the Climate Prediction Center.

These warnings, of course, are pushing many countries, like Germany to step up their fight against dirty sources of power and honor their commitment to the Paris agreement in 2015.

The Philippines, unlike Germany and other countries, are far from making waves when it comes to greater use of renewable. This is a pity since we Filipinos have more reasons to shift to renewable power.

For starters, we are a country that is endowed with plenty of natural resources. We are just the third biggest geothermal power producer in the world. The Philippines used to be second, but sadly was overtaken by Indonesia (which merits a separate article). We are also a tropical country as well. Yet here, we are a nation that has coal plants as the major source of energy.

It also makes sense for us to do our share to help the earth limit its global warming. The Philippines, after all, has been tagged as one of the most vulnerable nations to climate change. But we are a country that has pushed back its target of sourcing 35 percent of overall energy needs by 2030 to 2040.

Plus, there’s a clamor renewable power among Filipinos. A survey by Pulse Asia last year showed that 89 percent of Filipinos are in favor of renewable energy. But alas, the country will be adding some. 10,423 MW of coal power.

We have every reason to shift to renewable energy. We have the natural resources. We are a country that suffers greatly from the effects of climate change. Our citizens want cleaner forms of energy. But no, we remain a nation dependent on coal. How ironic. And sad.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/business/2018/12/26/1879827/iemop-proposes-nationwide-system-renewable-energy-development

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/2019-may-be-the-warmest-year-on-record-as-a-result-of-an-el-nino-event-exacerbated-by-global-warming/70006943

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/16/world/climate-2018-hottest-year-for-ocean/index.html

Good and Sad Headlines

 

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Renewable Energy dominated the power mix of Germany in 2018. Photo c/o Time.com

The New Year started with news of record highs for the renewable energy sector.

In Germany, renewable energy dominated the power mix for 2018. A study by Bruno Burger of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems showed that Germany is on its way to becoming less dependent on fossil fuel as renewable energy accounted for 40 percent of the country’s electricity production in 2018 while 38 percent came from coal. This is the first time renewables has overtaken coal as Germany’s primary power source. Wind power also became the second biggest power source.

Similarly, a  new record high in renewable energy use was also recorded last year by the United Kingdom (UK).

According to climate research and news site, Carbon Brief, growth in renewable energy use in the UK rose to 33 percent, a record-breaking figure. On the other hand, fossil fuel use dropped to 46 percent, the lowest ever recorded as many coal power plant closed last year. The UK has earlier pledged to phase out all coal plants by 2025.

These two countries’ achievements only show that indeed a shift to cleaner forms of energy is possible.

Unfortunately, the Philippines has not been making headlines for its use of renewable power.

On the contrary, recent headlines about the energy sector talks about the increase in power rates due to the second tranche of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion or TRAIN law.

The second installment of the law equals an additional excise tax of Php2.00 per liter of diesel and gasoline an added 12 percent value for 2019. The total increase per liter of diesel will be Php2.24. Last year, Php 2.50 taxes were levied on diesel and bunker fuel.

Naturally, the new taxes will have a domino effect on consumer prices, transport fares, and yes, power rates.

No, I am not questioning the merits of our new taxation scheme. I leave that to tax experts and economists. What I am merely pointing out is that the new taxes also increase power rates because of the Philippines’ dependence on traditional sources of power.

Estimates by The Independent Electricity Market Operator of the Philippines (IEMOP) show that the second tranche of TRAIN law will raise electricity prices by P0.1111 per kilowatt hour (kWh). By 2020 or on the third installment, the increase would be P0.1311 per kWh. The first phase already raised electricity prices by P0.0904 per kWh. These estimates according to IEMOP are based on the assumptions of Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) related to its sourcing energy mix.

Naturally, the power rates will increase if fuel prices in the world market increase, too. In the words of IEMOP President Francis Saturnino Juan, “So, these are the incremental amounts, but of course if the price of fuel itself will increase, then that will add to this incremental increase in 2019 and 2020 because of the staggered increase in the implementation of the law,” he said.

The issue of increasing power prices is a separate one from that of volatility. Volatility itself causes over-all costs to rise because of uncertainty. Because we are dependent on global markets, necessarily we are exposed to global price swings.

We could have spared the Filipinos from this additional burden if we increased the share of renewable power in our power mix a long time ago. Why pay more for expensive sources of energy when we could have just harnessed our natural resources well? This is especially true for off-grid islands that are powered on diesel-fired generators. We have to keep in mind that 80 percent of the operating cost of power generation in isolated islands are spent on diesel. And with added taxes on petroleum products, we can expect higher prices of power generation for the off-grid areas.

That’s just the problem with our reliance on traditional sources of energy and the government’s lack of appreciation for renewables — it leaves Filipinos vulnerable to a variety of factors. Sadly, it is the consumers that suffer when there is no political will to push for a greater share of renewable energy.

References:

https://businessmirror.com.ph/after-hurdling-2018s-regulatory-crisis-power-industry-players-are-ready-for-year-of-the-pig/

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/renewable-energy-germany-coal-power-environment-green-solar-wind-a8711176.html

https://www.ft.com/content/ea2feb40-0e8e-11e9-a3aa-118c761d2745

More Competition in the New Year and the Coming Years

The previous year ended with news that the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium won the bidding for power distribution of the New Clark City, the first city in the Philippines to have a smart-power grid and underground cables. This means that residents and business of the smart city will enjoy low utility rates.

The Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA), owner of the New Clark City is set to ink the agreement this month with the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium, consisting of Meralco, Marubeni Corp., Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., and Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Their proposed tariff bid was P0.6188 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

The Meralco and Marubeni consortium was able to beat the Aboitiz-Kepco Consortium of the Olongapo Energy Corp. and Kepco Philippines Holdings Inc, which proposed a P0.9888 per kWh tariff.

It is worthy to note that both bids were lower than the tariff ceiling Php 1.25 kWh set by the BCDA for power distribution. The proposals are also cheaper than the Php1.24 kWh of Mactan electric, the lowest distribution supply metering tariff that’s under the traditional distribution system.

This bidding is proof that competition, as any economist worth his or her salt would know, would always benefit consumers. And competition in the distribution of power is what the Filipinos need to enjoy cheaper power rates. Although the game I talk about is not exactly in this context, but this recent bidding gives flavor to what I mean.

And since it is the start of the year, let me share my reflections on what can be done to achieve lower electricity bills for all of us.

We can start by allowing more franchise holders in a single area rather than stick with the current rules of only granting a franchise to one. The logic is simple. Firms vying for the same customer base will find ways to beat their competitors either concerning better service or price.

Unfortunately, allowing just one franchise holder per area fails to push the franchise holder to improve its services and offer competitive pricing. This is what monopoly does– leave the firm to dictate prices and be complacent in its service delivery. If several businesses are competing for the same customer base, then surely we can expect players to always be on their toes to find ways to beat other firms or electric cooperatives.

Our lawmakers can also review the rules for the Retail Competition and Open Access (RCOA), too. Present rules, after all, require that only those with 750 kWh or higher monthly peak demand or contestable customers can choose their power providers. This means those with lesser than 750 kWh or captive customers are not given that option.

But why should we single out those with higher consumption and not give the option to all power consumers to choose their sources and distributors? If indeed the consumers’ welfare is the top priority, then we should also allow captive customers this alternative. We need to have some solutions to what people expect to be “stranded assets.” This, surely, can be addressed. We just need creativity here.

These are just some of the changes we need if we want Filipinos to benefit from the essence of EPIRA, the law crafted to foster more competition in the energy sector. We need to make major changes if indeed the Filipino consumers’ welfare is of the utmost importance.

The New Year brings hope to all of us. And, it is my wish for the New Year that our regulators would see the critical role that competition plays in the energy sector and have the political will to make the changes needed.

Ambitious, Admirable and Much Needed

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Spanish Turbines. Spain wants to source all its power needs from renewable sources by 2050. Photo c/o http://www.treehugger.con

Spain recently announced its plan to source all its power needs from renewable energy by 2050 in the hope of fully decarbonizing its economy. To achieve this goal, its government is committing to installing 3,000 megawatts (MW) of wind and solar capacity yearly in the next decade.

Aside from additional capacity from renewables, the Spanish government will also ban new licenses for hydrocarbon exploitation, fracking wells, and fossil fuel drills. Spain will also allot one-fifth of its national budget to mitigate the effects of climate change.

The government is prepared to look after the welfare of workers who are likely to lose their jobs due to the shift to renewable energy by providing early retirement schemes and re-skilling in clean energy jobs.

Not surprisingly, Spain’s announcement was hailed by many. The chief executive of the SolarPower Europe trade association, James Watson described Spain’s move as “a wake-up call to the rest of the world”.

Likewise, the chief executive of the European Climate Foundation, and former French climate envoy, Laurence Tubiana said that this move is both inspirational and groundbreaking. “By planning on going carbon neutral, Spain shows that the battle against climate change is deadly serious, that they are ready to step up and plan to reap the rewards of decarbonization,” she stressed.

Spain is not the only country that is making the headlines for its commitment to using more renewable energy. A recent report by Green Energy Markets found that Australia is likely to have three-quarters of its energy needs supplied by renewables by 2030.

The report noted that the installation of 150 megawatts of solar rooftop energy systems in residential and commercial zones in October alone is a record breaker as it is 76 percent higher than the monthly average last year. Australia has also committed to large-scale solar and wind farm projects with a total capacity of 412 watts with construction set to commence in October.

The additional 412 MW capacity brings the year-to-date total to 3,200 MW. The report stressed that this recent commitment and additional capacities will allow the majority of Australia’s power needs to source from clean forms of energy. “If we maintained over the next decade the record rate of both rooftop solar installations and wind and solar farm construction commitments that have prevailed since 2017 then renewable energy would represent 78 percent of electricity supply across Australia’s west and east coast main grids, ” the report noted.

Spain’s move, as well as Australia’s accomplishments, are more than welcome developments. After all, we need drastic action to combat the effects of climate change. More so since the world has only 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe as recently warned by the United Nations. This gloomy warning says that the world has only a dozen years to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5 C. Otherwise, we will see the worsening of droughts, floods, poverty, and extreme heat.

Speaking of extreme heat, scientists also say that 2018 is likely to be the fourth hottest year on record. According to the World Meteorological Organization, the average global temperature between January and October was close to 1 c above the pre-industrial baseline.

The WMO stresses that the 20 warmest years on record happened in the past 22 years and the four hottest have all come in the last four years. A warmer world is very alarming and has dire effects according to WMO Deputy Secretary-General Elena Manaenkova. “Every fraction of a degree of warming makes a difference to human health and access to food and fresh water, to the extinction of animals and plants, to the survival of coral reefs and marine life,” she said.

Unfortunately, the Filipinos do not seem to share the other countries enthusiasm for renewable energy. Our energy planners and government officials fail to realize that shifting to renewables is the only way forward if we are to provide power for all as well as help save the planet.

This lack of appreciation is lamentable since the Filipinos will surely benefit from using more renewables. For example, off-grid islands will no longer have to rely on the expensive diesel-powered generators if we only we can harness our natural resources properly. In fact, one study showed that the Philippines could save as much as Php10 billion if off-grid islands turn to RE instead of the expensive diesel generators.

Plus, renewables can help ease the burden of Filipinos who pay more for power consumption everytime the international coal prices shoot up or when the peso falls against the dollars. As I have been explaining, renewable energy provides a fixed price whereas coal and gas power sources result in higher power rates as prices are affected by movements in the foreign exchange and world prices.

Of course, the Philippines should also do its part in helping improve the world’s carbon footprint. After all, our country is ranked as one of the most vulnerable to climate change, according to credit rater Moody’s. “The Philippines’ heavy reliance on agriculture (31% of employment) and high exposure to climate-related disasters (on average 19 events per year over the last decade) imply that it was already among a group of sovereigns that we assessed as vulnerable to climate change — but it is now among the most vulnerable.”

The reported, which was released last May, noted that the calamities in the country affect economic activities and food production. Plenty of Filipinos have also lost their lives due to natural disasters. It is then wise for us to do our share in mitigating the effects of climate change since the Filipinos suffer so much from its consequences.
Clearly, we need to grab every opportunity to reduce our carbon footprint to help keep global warming at the desired level as well as improve the Filipinos access to energy. This is why the two countries announcements and achievements may be ambitious but nevertheless admirable. Such actions, particularly shifting to renewable energy is what the world and the Filipinos badly need right now.

References:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/nov/13/spain-plans-switch-100-renewable-electricity-2050

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-11/30/c_137641641.htm

http://time.com/5466681/climate-change-hottest-year/

Electricity-Sector Opportunities in the Philippines: The Case for Wind- and Solar-Powered Small Island Grids. The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis

https://www.bworldonline.com/philippines-rated-among-most-vulnerable-to-climate-change-in-new-moodys-ranking/

Small Victories

 

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The EU agreed to increase RE share to 32% by 2030. Photo c/o https://www.finchannel.com

There are many small victories to celebrate among renewable energy advocates.

Last June, the European Commission, Parliament and Council agreed to increase renewable power use in the region to 32 percent by 2030, up from the previous goal of 27 percent.

Aside from setting this target, the agreement also included removal of barriers to entry of renewable energy small players as well as a review of the 32 percent goal in 2023.

The new goal was set so that the region can meet its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent, below 1990 levels by 2030 as part of its commitment to the Paris Agreement of keeping global warming below 2 degrees. “This deal is a hard-won victory in our efforts to unlock the true potential of Europe’s clean energy transition,” EU Climate Commissioner Miguel Arias Canete was quoted.

And there is more good news from this region since Sweden is set to achieve its renewable energy targets 12 years ahead of the deadline.

The Nordic nation is likely to reach its 2030 renewable energy target of generating 18 terawatt-hours annually from renewables by the end of the year according to the Swedish Wind Energy Association (SWEA). This feat will be possible, thanks to the aggressive installation of wind turbines since some 3,681 wind turbines will be operational across the country by year-end.

Europe is not the only one that brought good news. Japan also recently announced its plans of boosting renewable energy use by 2030 by 22 to 24 percent. Currently, the country sources 15 percent of its energy demand from renewable sources.

Unfortunately, the Philippines did not make a similar announcement and instead opted to push down our goal of sourcing 35 percent of overall power needs from RE by 2030 to 2040.

But this is not to say that we lack good news in renewable energy front or that Filipinos entirely lack appreciation for renewable energy. After all, several local government units (LGUs) have declared their support for cleaner forms of power.

For example, last June, the city council of Ozamiz revoked an earlier resolution endorsing the proposal to build a 300-megawatt coal-fired plant and instead adopted a new one to look for prospective investors for renewable energy in the city.

The same case happened in Bohol last March where its local government prevented the building of new coal power plants since “the entire Provincial Government of Bohol are fully intent on maintaining the sanctity and pristine condition of the environment.”

Eventually, the LGU of Bohol passed an ordinance against the establishment of coal power plants in the province on April 6, joining the ranks of Guimaras and Ilocos Norte, which had already banned coal and shifted to renewable energy.

Yes, our national government may be slow in realizing the value of renewable power, unlike other nations like the European countries and Japan but at least our provinces know the worth of going renewables. Maybe soon, more Filipinos including government officials will realize what renewable power can do for our country and that, as Guimaras Governor Samuel Gumarin said in a speech, “a sustainable-development path, powered by renewable energy, is not only possible but more viable.”

References:

https://www.rappler.com/nation/203386-bohol-no-coal-ordinance-epira-greenpeace

https://climatereality.ph/climate-reality-ph-lauds-ozamiz-city-climate-action-819/

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/japan-aims-for-24–renewable-energy-but-keeps-nuclear-central-10495024

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/jun/14/eu-raises-renewable-energy-targets-to-32-by-2030

Sweden to reach its 2030 renewable energy target this year