Revisiting Laudato Si (“Praised Be”)

In July 2015,  Pope Francis released the Laudato Si or Praised Be, an encyclical letter on climate change and environment.

The head of the Catholic Church through the 180-page encyclical stressed that climate change is a major problem that all of us should address.

“Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods. It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day.”

The Pope warned us of the dangers the world faces if we fail to take care of the environment better, paying extra attention to the possible suffering of those from developing countries.

“Will probably be felt by developing countries in the coming decades. Many of the poor live in areas particularly affected by phenomena related to warming, and their means of subsistence are largely dependent on natural reserves and ecosystemic services such as agriculture, fishing, and forestry.”

The Pontiff simply didn’t criticize humankind for the negligence in protecting the environment. He also offered solutions, saying that replacing traditional sources of energy with renewable energy will go a long way in helping to decarbonize the world.

“We know that technology based on the use of highly polluting fossil fuels – especially coal, but also oil and, to a lesser degree, gas – needs to be progressively replaced without delay. Until greater progress is made in developing widely accessible sources of renewable energy, it is legitimate to choose the lesser of two evils or to find short-term solutions.”

It’s been four years since Pope Francis released the Laudato Si. And the Pontiff continues to campaign for the world to fulfill its obligation of protecting God’s gift, the earth.

Last June, the Pope met with the top executives of global oil and gas corporations in the Vatican where he insisted that carbon pricing is essential to address global warming. He also demanded climate change deniers be open about what science has to say.

The head of the Catholic Church urged to penalize polluters as the word needs a “radical energy transition” away from carbon to save the earth.

The meeting last June is not the first time Pope Francis met with leaders of gas and oil companies. He did the same last year where he said that the continuing search for fossil fuels is “worrying.”

Fortunately, the Catholic Church is heeding the Pope’s call for drastic action and shift to cleaner forms of power.

For one, the Filipino Catholics are working to heed the Pope’s call. A few weeks ago, the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) announced that it will stop supporting fossil fuel energy source. Dioceses in the Philippines would instead place their money in renewable energy. Fr. Edwin Gariguez, executive secretary of the CBCP-National Secretariat for Social Action (NASSA), called this decision “A milestone for the Church ecology advocacy.”`

He added that divestment from fossil fuel is part of the CBCP 10-point agenda in following the Pope’s call in the Laudato Si. This comes after the Vatican asked CBCP what the CBCP is doing to respond to the encyclical.

And it’s not just the Catholic Church that seems to be following the words of the Pontiff.

In the United Kingdom, some 5,500 Anglican churches have shifted to renewable energy. According to Christian Aid, 15 Anglican Cathedrals are now using 100 percent green tariffs.

The Bishop of Salisbury, Nicholas Holtam also the Church of England’s lead bishop on the environment said that the Anglican Church’s move for cleaner power is due to the church’s recognition that climate change is “one of the great moral challenges of our time”.

“They are also giving a boost to clean energy which is essential to reduce harmful carbon emissions,” Holtam added.

It is heartwarming to see the Catholic Church and other religions recognize the need for drastic actions in saving our planet. More so, when we aren’t making many dents in saving the planet by limiting energy-related global dioxide emissions.

A report by the International Energy Association (IEA) showed that global energy-related CO2 emissions increased by 1.7 percent in 2018, the highest rate of growth since 2013. “We have seen an extraordinary increase in global energy demand in 2018, growing at its fastest pace this decade,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director.

This data only shows that we have to act swiftly and shift to renewable energy as the power sector accounts for at least two-thirds of the energy-related CO2 emissions globally.

We then must act now as Pope Francis urged us to do so four years ago: 

“We may well be leaving to coming generations debris, desolation and filth. The pace of consumption, waste and environmental change has so stretched the planet’s capacity that our contemporary lifestyle, unsustainable as it is, can only precipitate catastrophes, such as those which even now periodically occur in different areas of the world. The effects of the present imbalance can only be reduced by our decisive action, here and now.”

Addressing climate change and the Pope’s call will go beyond just adopting renewable energy and other forms of sustainable energy. I think we need to take a closer look  at how our economies work. We need to delve into the disparity between the rich and poor in the world and why this gap continues to grow. Can capitalism as we know today be the right economic structure that allows the world to address climate change?  Or is it the source of the problem in the first place?

We need to ponder and wonder more if we want to leave to our children and grandchildren a cleaner and more sustainable planet Earth. 

References:

https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/news/nation/700666/phl-catholic-bishops-vow-to-turn-their-backs-on-dirty-energy-sources/story/

https://www.aljazeera.com/ajimpact/pope-world-climate-emergency-demands-radical-energy-transition-190614174457798.html

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/03/over-5500-churches-in-the-uk-embrace-renewable-energy.html

Race Against The Clock

 

A study revealed that 77 percent of the major cities in the world will experience drastic changes in climate conditions by 2050. I won’t be around by then but my grandchildren will be around. So this is important to me. 

Crowther Lab, a research group based in Switzerland studied the impact on 250 major cities’ temperature if the world’s temperature reaches 2 degree Celsius. The study is the first global analysis of the likely changes in climate conditions in major cities due to global warming.

The researchers found out that a fifth of the world’s cities will see unprecedented climate changes including intense dry and rainy seasons. These would include Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Madrid, Seattle, London, and Moscow to name a few.

Just how drastic will the changes be? The study says summers and winters in Europe will be warmer with 3.5 degree Celsius to 4.7 degree Celsius average increases. Another way of imagining it is by measuring the temperature change, which is by thinking that a city would shift by 620 miles further south.

Naturally, the cities farthest away from the equator will experience the most changes in the average temperature. But those near the equator or in the tropics such as Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Jakarta will feel the strongest impacts of climate change. 

These changes don’t bode well for major cities says Jean Francis-Bastin, the lead author of the report. “It is a change in climate conditions that is likely to increase the risk of flooding and extreme drought,” said Francis-Bastin. 

The Philippines and not just Manila will be greatly affected by climate change, too.

The Global Peace Index 2019, released last June showed that the Philippines is the country most susceptible to hazards due to climate change.

The study revealed that 47 percent of our country’s population is located in areas highly exposed to climate hazards such as tropical cyclones, tsunami, floods, and drought.

Our Southeast Asia neighbors such as Bangladesh, Myanmar, Indonesia also made it to the list of the countries being at the highest risk because of climate change.

Manila also ranked seventh with most risk to a single hazard while our neighbor, Vietnam landed the first spot for this category.

Indeed, the Philippines and the rest of the world are constantly reminded to take serious efforts in limiting the effects of climate change. And we need to act fast as stressed by Francis-Bastin: “We definitely and very quickly need to change the way we are living on the planet. Otherwise, we are just going to have more and more droughts, flooding and extreme events.”.

Fortunately, nations responded to these warnings as early as 2015 by committing to limit global warming to just 1.5 c in the 2015 Paris Climate Change accord. But how is the world faring?

Unfortunately, the world’s temperature continues to increase. In 2018, the world recorded its fourth warmest year on record. 

But this is not to say that nations are not making any progress at all in decarbonizing the world. On the contrary, data show increases in investments in renewable energy and rapid developments in the use of clean power around the world. 

For example, the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) showed that 2018 was the fifth consecutive year that investments in renewable energy exceeded the $300 billion mark.

Similarly, the Business Renewables Center of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) also showed that in 2018, the United States renewables market has almost doubled its figure of corporate off-site deals since 2015

As most know, shifting to renewable power is one of the best ways to help limit the effects of climate change. But are these investments and developments enough? 

Apparently not, says the United Nations Development Goals report 2019 after tagging climate change as “the defining issue of our time and the greatest challenge to sustainable development.”

The UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Liu Zhenmin, in his introduction to the report stressed that cutting greenhouse gas emissions is the most crucial task to mitigate the effects of climate change. He noted that “As we are already seeing, the compounded effects will be catastrophic and irreversible: increasing ocean acidification, coastal erosion, extreme weather conditions, the frequency and severity of natural disasters, continuing land degradation, loss of vital species and the collapse of ecosystems.”

Unfortunately, current scenarios and actions to help the environment are not enough. The world may be seeing an increase in renewable investments but the  UN report emphasized that investments in fossil fuels still outpaced the $781billion recorded in 2016 as the figure is significantly higher than the  $332.1 billion investments in clean power in 2018.

Indeed, we are racing against time if we want to save our environment for the future generations. Drastic actions must be taken. The UN report emphasized it best by saying “Unprecedented changes in all aspects of society will be required to avoid the worst effects of climate change.”

References:

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singapore-kuala-lumpur-unprecedented-climate-change-2050-11710274

https://solarindustrymag.com/report-2018-a-record-breaking-year-for-corporate-renewable-energy-deals/

https://about.bnef.com/blog/clean-energy-investment-exceeded-300-billion-2018

https://news.abs-cbn.com/spotlight/06/15/19/country-most-threatened-by-climate-change-study-says-its-philippines

The New Age of Grids

The Philippines finally appreciates the value of smart grids.

For starters, the upcoming 200-hectare New Clark City (NCC) located in Clark’s special economic zone will boast of having the first completely smart power grid in the Philippines.  The NCC, after all, is designed to be the country’s first smart, sustainable and disaster-resilient city.

NCC’s owner, the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) already inked a deal with the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium to be the city’s power distributor. This, after the consortium, won the bidding with their proposed tariff bid of Php 0.6188 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The tariff rate is lower than the Php1.25 kWh tariff ceiling set by the BCDA for power distribution.  It is also cheaper than the Php1.24 kWh rate of Mactan Electric, the lowest distribution supply metering tariff under the traditional distribution system.

The smart city will have state-of-the-art facilities on par with other smart cities around the world.  The smart grid in the NCC is seen to have better reliability standards and will allow customers to access real-time information from the distribution utility. Distribution lines will be underground adding to the aesthetics of an environmental-friendly city.

Plus, just recently, the National Electrification Administration (NEA) has announced that it has piloted a smart grid technology aimed at improving the reliability of a Batangas electric cooperative’s distribution system with the help of the Japan International Cooperation Agency. The technology to be used in this pilot is the Distribution Automation System that is expected to improve the distribution system reliability as well as lessen the duration of a power outage. These are all thanks to automation.

NEA says the smart grid technology will hopefully do wonders for the operational efficiency, particularly the reliability of the cooperatives’ system reliability.

Indeed, smart grids are now making their way to the Philippines. And why not when there are so many advantages in investing in modernizing our power distribution system?

For one, smart girds, unlike the traditional grids allows for two-way communication of electricity data thus providing real-time data collection on the power demand and supply during the transmission and distribution.  This means that the electrical grid can respond quickly to changes in the power demand, thanks to the grid’s controls, automation, computation, and equipment. The said cannot be said of the traditional grid that has a one-way interaction during generation and consumption.

smart-grid-Borg-2

Smart grids empowers consumers by providing real-time data on power demand and supply. Photo c/o telecomdrive.com

 

Smart grids also empower consumers by providing them with information on when the power demand is at its lowest or highest. This information allows them to schedule high energy-consuming activities such as ironing or running the washing machine when electricity costs are lowest. Plus, smart grid coverage lets consumers purchase their electricity straight from retail suppliers.

Another benefit of smart grids is its ability to integrate renewable energy into the system.

In the case of the NCC, the BCDA plans to integrate embedded generation that has renewable energy as its primary power source. The city can also source its power from rooftop solar PVs, waste-to-energy and natural gas, among others.

Clearly,  modernizing our power system with the help of smart grids is a great way to move forward. But, of course, regulations must also be updated as we shift to the smart grid.

Currently, the Philippines has no rules concerning smart grids. The Department of Energy has said that a roadmap for smart grids in the country is underway and will be released by the third quarter of this year in the form of a department circular.

Hopefully, this roadmap will be able to address issues regarding the use of smart grids such as smart meter, real-time dynamic pricing, and grid cybersecurity, to name a few. May it will pave the way for the proliferation of smart grids so that Filipino consumers can take advantage of such technological advancements.

Finally, let me say that the advent of smart grids will lead to the integration of ICT and power systems. This will lead further to the development of data centers nationwide, increase in the number of internet exchange servers, and eventually bring down the cost of both power and telecommunication services. The distribution grids that can adapt to these developments will be those that have the 21st technologies at their disposal. This will indeed help spur the development of the country. As I said, however, only competition in the distribution sector can speed this up.

The Biggest Loser

Around half of the world’s energy needs will come from renewable energy by 2050. That’s according to the latest Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) report.

The study stressed that renewable’s domination in the next three decades will occur along with the expected 62 percent demand increase for power and an additional $13.3 trillion worth of renewable energy projects.

All these scenarios are feasible as the cost of renewables has been plummeting in the last few years, the report stresses.  Since 2010, solar and wind costs have dropped by 85  and 49 percent, respectively. Battery storage costs have also declined by 85 percent.

The BNEF says solar and wind power will supply half of the world’s electricity while other renewable energy sources such as geothermal, fuel cells and devices will contribute around 21 percent.

Coal, on the other hand, will be the biggest loser in the power sector as its share in the global generation will decline to 12 percent by 2050 from around 37 percent today.

Europe is leading the shift to cleaner and sustainable energy. The region is expected to source around 92 percent of its power needs from renewable energy. China and India are also expected to source roughly two-thirds of its power from wind and solar by 2050 while the United States will get around 43 percent of its power needs from renewables.

In contrast, the Philippines is expected to increase the share of coal-fired generators in the next 30 years according to the Asia Pacific Energy Research Center (Aperc).

In its latest Energy Demand and Supply outlook report, Aperc stressed that coal is likely to contribute 39 percent of the country’s power needs by 2050 or three percent more than its current 36 percent share. On the other hand, renewable energy is seen to account for 20 percent of the Philippines power supply in 2050, which is lesser than its present 24 percent contribution.

Aperc’s projections are based on business as usual (BAU) scenario where existing policies and current trends stay the same. “Large increases in fossil fuel generation, particularly coal which triples, overshadow a more than doubling of renewable generation in the BAU,” the report says.

Aperc notes that allowing coal power to dominate our energy mix will make the country more vulnerable as the Philippines’ net energy imports will have to double. Promoting renewables and diversifying trade will be important for maintaining energy security,” Aperc said.

Our country’s dependence on fossil fuel imports also come at a high cost according to the international research group, Climate Analytics. Its report shared during recent climate talks in Germany showed that the Philippines fuel imports in 2017 are equivalent to 3.5 percent of its gross domestic product or around $11 billion.

The report also stresses that the country will benefit from shifting to renewable energy since doing so will decrease the external cost from air pollution. Climate Analytics pegged the annual average air pollution cost savings around $1.1 billion by 2025.

Adding more renewable energy in the country’s power mix is feasible, the international research group says. The report cites several studies revealing that covering merely 1.5 percent of the Philippines land area with solar installation can generate around 792 terawatt hours of power, a figure that’s 10 times the country’s total power generated in 2016.

Clearly, a shift to renewable energy is possible for nations including the Philippines. And around the world, coal is expected to be the biggest loser by 2050. Meanwhile, our country may also end up as one of the sorriest fools should we allow coal to continue to dominate our power mix.

Juan de la Cruz becomes the biggest loser.

References:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-18/the-world-will-get-half-its-power-from-wind-and-solar-by-2050

https://news.mb.com.ph/2019/06/22/climate-analytics-report-cites-potentials-of-renewable-in-the-philippines

/https://business.inquirer.net/272280/as-ph-economy-grows-coal-remains-king-says-think-tank#ixzz5s1l138er

Let’s Not Forget About The Jobs

The reminders to world leaders and governments to shift to green energy to help the environment are endless given that we only have a few years left to minimize the effects of climate change. There is also clamour for greater use of renewable energy to ensure energy security for all.

Arguably, environmental impact and energy security are two of the most commonly cited and discussed reasons why governments and private entities are urged to have more renewable energy in their portfolio, if not aim for 100 percent use of clean energy.

But there’s another direct benefit in paving the way for greener power: job generation. Creating more employment opportunities through renewable energy may take a backseat in advocating for renewable energy. Nevertheless, providing more work for people is another benefit of building more renewable energy plants and infrastructure. There are, after all, millions of jobs created by the renewable energy sector around the world. 

Recently, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) released its Renewable Energy and Jobs Annual Review 2019, which showed that some 11 million were employed by the sector around the world in 2018. The jobs provided last year is higher than the 10.3 million posted in 2017. The 11 million jobs provided by the renewable energy sector is almost 3.7 million more compared to 2012 when IRENA first started its yearly job report.

The rising number of employment generated by the sector is partly attributable to the world’s desire for low carbon economic growth as stressed by IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera who said: “Beyond pursuing climate goals, many governments have prioritised renewables as a driver of low-carbon economic growth. Diversification of the supply chain has broadened the sector’s geographic footprint beyond a few leading markets, as more countries link sustainable technology choices to broader socio-economic benefits.”

The report also noted that most employment opportunities were concentrated in a few countries like China, United States, Brazil, India, and some European Union countries. Almost a third of the jobs generated last year came from the Solar PV industry. It helped that off-grid solar sales are on the rise, which in turn increases the chances of spurring economic activities in isolated areas in various countries.

The Philippines made it in the top 10 countries for wind employment.  According to IRENA, the top 10 countries for wind employment provide 85 percent of wind jobs. The Philippines proudly landed the 10th spot on the list as the country has employed around 16,900 jobs in the wind energy sector. Unfortunately for our country, the number of jobs for Filipinos in the Solar PV sector declined as there were only 20,800 employed in 2018, lower than the 34,000 recorded in 2017. This is largely due, I believe, in the non-resumption of the FIT program for the Philippines.

That’s rather sad to hear since a study by Greenpeace entitled “Green is Gold: How Renewable Energy Can Save Us money and Generate Jobs” noted that the Philippines can generate as much as  4.5 to 5.5 kWh/m2/day as the country is a tropical one. This means that our solar power industry can generate plenty of employment since research by the University of California, Berkeley showed that “photovoltaic technology produces more jobs per unit of electricity than any other energy source. Most of the jobs are in construction and installation of solar facilities and can’t be outsourced to other countries.”

There will be more jobs as we harness more power from the sun. The same Greenpeace report noted that a 10 MW solar power plant can provide 1000 people during the construction phase alone as well as an additional 100 full-time employees. In the case of our solar farm in Subic, we managed to train and hire indigenous people thus making them even more productive in their own lands.

JCI

Renewable energy development create jobs. At Emerging Power Inc, we hired and tirade indigenous people thus helping the community along the way. Photo c/o https://www.emergingpowerinc.com

The above figures are just for solar energy. Other renewables such as wind, geothermal and hydro, to name a few could provide employment for thousands of Filipinos as well.

Luckily for us, our country is blessed with so many natural resources. We can harness these resources to save our environment, ensure energy security for all, and provide employment for Filipinos. 

Unfortunately, policies and regulations have restricted the growth of the renewable energy industry. Just take our geothermal power sector as an example. We were once the second biggest geothermal power producer in the world. Sadly, we are now just ranked third as Indonesia has produced 1,800 megawatts (MW) whereas the Philippines decreased its output from 1850 MW to 1600 MW.

Yes, our country enjoys abundant natural resources. But we have to find a way to make renewable energy development a priority in the government’s agenda so that we can enjoy the many benefits of green power including more jobs for Filipinos.

References:

 IRENA Renewable Energy and Jobs Annual Review 2019

“Green is Gold: How Renewable Energy Can Save Us Money and Generate Jobs”. Greenpeace

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Towards A More Distributed Energy Future

Recently, the Department of Energy (DOE) has announced that it is finalizing the rules on distributed and small scale scale renewable energy projects in off-grid areas in the country. While this should have been done years ago, at least distributed generation is getting its fair share of attention. And the circular should go beyond just generation, it should now allow local groups or communities to establish, for themselves, a distributed energy platform. I have discussed this in another blog where I emphasized the realities of the 21st century in power distribution.

The draft circular entitled “Guidelines Governing the Development, Registration and Administration of Distributed, Small-Grid Renewable Energy Projects and Facilities” aims to promote the development and utilization of Renewable Energy (RE) resources in isolated or off-grid areas through qualified RE developers.

The DOE stresses that the guidelines are in line with the government’s efforts to achieve 100 percent electrification in the country. The Energy Department added that the new guidelines will also help in expanding Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and Distributed Generation (DG) in the country. The former refers to any technology that allows those with distributed generation facilities to be sold back to the grid as permitted by regulators while the latter is  any technology that produces energy outside of the grid. The challenge here, of course, is how much will the “grid” purchase the generated power?  This poses the same problem as “net metering” where power distributors undercut the rooftop solar owners by paying them only the “average” power generation rate.  As solar produces only during the day, the power distributors get an arbitrage by buying low during peak hours.

Under the draft circular, RE developers must apply and register their small-grid facilities of not more than one megawatt capacity. Again, limiting it to 1 megawatt does not make sense.  The whole idea of distributed generation does not imply limits in generation. Hopefully the DOE will see this flaw and amend the circular.

Admittedly, the new guidelines are a welcome development as DGs and DERs are helpful in achieving 100 percent electrification rate for countries, especially those that are archipelagic such as the Philippines. I hope, however, the DOE will push the envelope even further.

DER technologies, which consist of mostly energy generation and storage systems such as batteries and flywheels that are located near the end users are becoming rampant.  Around the world, power systems are moving away from centralized distribution as energy mixes are now integrating DERs,  according to a study of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) entitled, “Utility of the Future”. This means that the traditional model of distribution where consumers source energy from a single utility with the help of main transmission lines are slowly being replaced by DERs.

The growth of DERs is due to a variety of factors, the MIT study says. For one, more nations are shifting away from traditional sources of power and are adding more renewable sources into their energy mix. The study notes that the growth of renewable energy is happening partly due to and in parallel with the world’s focus on decarbonizing power systems to combat climate change. As such, many advanced nations are leveraging DERs technologies to distribute cleaner power to decarbonize their countries.

DER system

Around the world, power systems are moving away from centralized distribution as energy mixes are now integrating DERs. Photo c/o of Siemens.com

Welcoming DERs bodes well for the Philippines. The main benefit of DERs is that its distributed nature allows for cheaper, more effective energy distribution services, especially for those without access to centralized resources such as our off-grid islands. 

Renewable energy and DERs mean cheaper power for off-grid areas especially in the Philippines. Various studies have stressed the importance of renewables in achieving electrification at cheaper costs for the country. 

For example, the study entitled, “Electricity-Sector Opportunities in the Philippines: The Case for Wind- and Solar-Powered Small Island Grids,” noted that there’s roughly Php10 billion in savings if the Philippines rely on RE instead of traditional sources of power for off-grid areas or missionary areas. “Small island grids powered by solar, wind, and other renewable energy could reduce dependence on expensively imported fossil fuel generation without compromising the availability of power and grid reliability,” the reported noted.

According to the DOE the Philippines’ electrification rate is at 89 percent. There are still around three million Filipino homes without electricity as of the end of 2018. These DERs then would be helpful in providing stable power to these households.

Aside from helping the off-grid areas achieve electrification, there are still many benefits in integrating DERs in our power system even in on-grid areas. This is because as the MIT study stressed, DERs help competition flourish in the energy sector given. After all, these technologies are changing the way electricity service delivery by altering the use and management of distribution systems. 

The MIT report stressed that current electricity distribution systems create a natural monopoly since regulators are blind to the distribution utilities’ actual cost and managerial efficiencies. This creates an opportunity for distribution utilities to increase their profit by merely convincing regulators that they have higher operating costs than they actually do, which is then passed on to consumers. 

The same cannot be said of DERs along with other technological advancements and mechanisms in the energy sector such as dynamic-based prices, advanced metering and energy management systems. These all require efficient price signal and information control systems.

Indeed, moving to a distributed energy system has many advantages. But changes in regulations must take place, too. Our Energy Department and regulators by this time should be rolling up their sleeves and getting ready to work for a more distributed energy system in the country for the benefit of the Filipino consumers.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/business/2019/05/27/1921099/doe-issue-new-rules-small-re-projects

Utility of the Future by Massachusetts Institute of Technology

https://business.inquirer.net/271715/napocor-sets-bidding-for-2-bohol-projects#ixzz5pmIont8q 

Overtaking Coal

For the first time, renewable energy has generated more electricity than coal in the United States. 

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), renewable power has overtaken coal generation last April by 16 percent. And renewables are expected to dominate the US power mix on May with EIA predicting that clean power will eclipse coal power by an additional 1.4 percent. 

Renewables dominating the energy mix of the United States is not a stroke of luck. In fact, clean power will consistently catch up with coal in the US in the near future says the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA): “Coal’s proponents may dismiss these monthly and quarterly ups and downs in generation share as unimportant, but we believe they are indicative of the fundamental disruption happening across the electric generation sector.”  

The IEEFA also foresees that renewable energy will generate more power consistently this year all the way to 2020 for the US. After all, coal’s share of the overall energy generation has been declining in the past few years from 45 percent in 2010 to 28 percent in 2018. By 2020, coal power is only expected to contribute just 24 percent of the needed power demand for the country.

The US is not the first country to achieve such a feat. Other countries have already managed to generate more power from renewables in the past.  One of the notable examples is Iceland, which produced 97 percent of the country’s household power requirements from wind in 2015. Its neighbor, Denmark also sourced 42 percent of its power from wind turbines in the same year. Similarly, Germany at one point was able to generate 78 percent of the day’s power demands from renewables.

image

Germany was able to generate 78 percent of the day’s power demands from renewables at one point. Photo c/o Time.com

The decline of coal power in the US is in sync with the developments in the global energy trends. According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), a third of the world’s installed electricity generation capacity in 2018 was from renewables. This is because 2/3 of the added power capacity last year came from renewable power.

Renewable power’s greater share in many countries’ energy mix only shows that renewables are the key to sustainable future notes IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “The strong growth in 2018 continues the remarkable trend of the last five years, which reflects an ongoing shift towards renewable power as the driver of global energy transformation.”

The shift to renewable power is much needed since experts have warned us that we only have a few years left to mitigate the effects of climate change. The United Nations in its report Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year stressed that the world only has 12 years to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5 °C. Otherwise, we will all suffer the risks of droughts, droughts, extreme heat, and poverty. 

Plus, recently, we were greeted with the news that the Earth’s carbon dioxide level is at an 800,000-year high. Our world has breached 415 part per million sometime this May, a level that has not been seen in millions of years according to data from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California-San Diego.

Taking drastic actions to limit global warming then is imperative for all of us. This means we should be cutting carbon dioxide emissions swiftly by reducing our fossil fuel consumption, the primary producer of greenhouse gasses. Going to renewable power is one of the best ways to decarbonize countries, after all.

Sadly, and as I have been pointing out, the Philippines is nowhere near the accomplishments of other countries when it comes to shifting to greener and cleaner energy.  Clearly, some of the major developers and major international banks have told me that they are no longer allowed to develop and/or finance coal power projects.

According to IRENA, the Philippines, from 2009 to 2018 only increased the share of renewable energy in the total power mix from 4732 to 6482 megawatts(MW) or roughly 37 percent. This growth is significantly less when compared to some of our Southeast Asian neighbors. For example, Vietnam has managed to grow its renewable power capacity from 7323 MW to 18523 MW or almost 153 percent in the same period. Likewise, Thailand has added roughly 152 percent of renewables into its generating capacity from 4130 MW to 10411 MW as well.

Some argue, that the Philippines only has a small contribution to the world’s carbon footprint. This is probably true, but it does not change the fact that the use of coal and fuel for power generation remains as the biggest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the country. However, this is not the only point.  A more important perspective here is the fact that the presence of coal has the tendency of INCREASING power cost.  As I have always argued the volatility of coal prices and the exchange rates contribute greatly to higher power costs.

The Philippine Climate Change Assessment Working Group 3 Report released last year notes that 41.8 percent of GHG emissions of the country comes from coal and fuel used for power generation and continues to grow by 3.7 percent annually. So, yes, there is a need for the Philippines to take drastic steps in decarbonizing our nation. This is feasible only if renewable power dominates our energy mix. And the sooner we act the better for us Filipinos as our country remains one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. 

Many countries are working harder to do share their share for the environment by turning to renewable power. Soon, nations will have more cleaner energy to use as they walk away from coal. The Philippines is nowhere near such a state. Yet, one can remain hopeful that we can soon see our country is also taking the fight against climate change by like other nations by allowing renewable energy to flourish and surpass coal power in the country.

References:

https://qz.com/1610977/solar-wind-plus-other-renewables-beat-coal-for-first-time-in-us/

https://cleantechnica.com/2016/02/04/how-11-countries-are-leading-the-shift-to-renewable-energy/

https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/11/20/18/greenhouse-gas-emission-in-ph-rising-report

IRENA RENEWABLE CAPACITY STATISTICS 2019

Press Release: Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC approved by governments

http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/session48/pr_181008_P48_spm_en.pdf

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/29/business/renewable-energy-coal-solar/index.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnparnell/2019/04/03/one-third-of-worlds-power-plant-capacity-is-now-renewable/#5801d1043064

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2019/05/13/climate-change-co-2-levels-hit-415-parts-per-million-human-first/1186417001/