We Need More Funding and Competition


The Senate recently approved a bill amending the Public Service Act to allow full foreign ownership in key industries like transport and telecommunication.

With 19 votes, the Upper House voted to pass Senate Bill No. 2094 which will pave the pay for 100% foreign ownership of railways, airlines, shipping firms, subways, and telecommunications. The 1987 Constitution puts a 40% foreign ownership on public utilities. The new bill is making a distinction between public utilities and public services and frees up the latter for 100% foreign ownership

Senator Grace Poe, one of the bill’s principal authors said that “The main purpose of this measure is to provide consumers with choices and I believe that, by opening our economy to a diverse set of investors, we could provide our fellow Filipinos with more and better choices,” 

The new bill still treats three main industries as public utilities as they are believed to be “natural monopolies.” These industries include Water Works and Sewerage, Transmission of Electricity, and Distribution of Electricity, and will remain subject to the 60-40 rule on foreign ownership.

I have written about this bill in the past where I have questioned why the Senate is treating electricity distribution as a natural monopoly. I have argued that natural monopoly cannot and should not be regulated as it is a market condition. Natural monopolies, after all, exist due to either high start-up costs or powerful economies of scale. Natural monopolies only exist when a single firm can serve the entire market at a lower cost instead of having multiple firms competing for the same market.

Again should the Philippines still classify power distribution classified as a natural monopoly despite the advancements in technology and global trends?

All we need to do is look at other countries. Take the United States for example where several companies heavily investing in non-wire alternatives (NWAs), which are pushing both start-up and fixed costs down. Several complines like Duke Energy and Con Edison can avoid spending billions on transmission infrastructure by investing heavily in NWAs combined with distributed energy resources (DERs) and mini-grids.

New technologies, after all, are removing barriers to entry in the distribution of electricity, which means more players can enter the market more easily given the lower upfront costs of distributing power.

What we are seeing here is not a case of a natural monopoly actually driven by the market but rather a legal monopoly created by lawmakers and regulators. This is a classic example of what Nobel Prize winner Vermon Sith pointed out in this paper “Currents of Competition in Electricity Markets” where he said that “Regulation has been applied far too broadly to the electric power industry. As a result, policies intended to restrain monopoly power have instead propagated that power.”

In a separate development, President Duterte has also signed an executive order (EO) 156, an electrification EO to enable electric cooperatives to pursue rural electrification. In the EO, the president stresses that underperforming electric cooperatives (ECs) and distribution utilities (DUs) are hampering the electrification efforts of the government. 

Aside from transferring the powers to take over the DU’s and EC’s operations from the National Electrification Administration to the Office of the President, the EO also ordered all DUs to submit a comprehensive masterplan for the total electrification of their respective franchise areas including a detailed inventory of all inadequately served areas and action plans to achieve complete electrification.

The EO also directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to craft procedures for the participation of local government and communities in determining whether their areas are inadequately served.

But perhaps an alternative route is to open up competition for the same franchise area. Currently, the government is only allowing a single firm for a franchise area, which means that the franchise holder does not have incentives to improve its services or to innovate. Again, our regulations are what’s creating legal monopolies as we can, in fact, have healthy competition in franchise areas only if the government allows it.

It’s great that the EO is asking the DOE to promulgate regulation for the entry and integration of DERs, microgrids, and other alternative service providers in the electric power industry, but we need as well to consider allowing more competition in the same franchise area. Otherwise, consumers will have to wait for DUs to be deemed as inadequate before they can get alternative DUs, and even then they only get served by a single company, which still will have the monopoly in the franchise area.

Plus, we can actually help solve the problem of lack of access to electricity if we do not create legal monopolies as what the Senate bill is doing to the electricity distribution. We need the technology and expertise of foreign companies in developing DERs, microgrids, NWAs, and other new tools that can easily provide power to off-grid areas.

A reactor in our energy forum sponsored by UPVI last October, Bill Lenihan, CEO of ZOLA Electric, a company that offers power solutions in Africa stressed that centralized grid systems won’t solve emerging markets’ problems. He added that countries like the Philippines must make DERs and microgrids as the main source of power in many underserved areas in the country.

However, developing these technologies will again, as I have mentioned, require funding and technologies that foreign companies can provide. To classify power distribution as a natural monopoly when it is not is like taking away the chance from Juan Dela Cruz from far-flung areas to have access to electricity and lessen his chance of improving his economic condition and that of his community at the soonest time possible. 

We Can and Must Do Better

269 cities and municipalities were left in the dark due to Typhoon Odette’s wrath. Photo c/o OneNews.PH

Christmas season is for merrymaking with friends and family. And we Filipinos just love this festive season.

However, many times the December holidays are spent dealing with the aftermath of strong typhoons. 

We just suffered the wrath of  Typhoon Odette that left around 400 dead as of this writing and caused almost Php16.7 billion in damages. The typhoon has also brought darkness to millions as 269 cities and municipalities experienced blackouts as the typhoon damaged transmission facilities and toppled electric posts. The National Disaster and Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRMMC) said that full restoration of power in affected areas may happen in February. Thousands of families are also without water supply and are going hungry.

Typhoon Odette is once again showing us that we have a disaster in the recovery efforts for electricity because of bureaucratic legal inanities. The governors were looking for interim generators. None of the generating companies could bring in gensets because that would have required bidding and then an approval from the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC). The local government units (LGUs) themselves couldn’t bring in gensets for the grid because they are not licensed generators. 

The most logical entity to provide interim generators would have been the grid operator, National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (NGCP). For one, it has the financial muscle and is mandated to provide ancillary services. Unfortunately the ERC interprets that providing power as a backup ancillary is not within NGCP’s mandate. I disagree. However, it was suggested that Congress exempts NGCP from this supposed prohibition. Unfortunately, again Congress is in recess. So the President has to call for a special session. 

In the meantime people are dying. 

We should indeed look at how we respond to calamities. Take the case of Bohol. Governor Arthur Yap is decrying the bureaucracy in disaster response as paperwork is delaying Bohol’s plan to use power barges to put an end to the crippling absence of power. In an interview, the governor said he has sought exemptions required by three power distribution firms and NGCP to tap into other power sources.

The lack of electricity he said is paralyzing Bohol’s disaster response and communication especially since many towns still do not have capabilities. Governor Yap said he has been following up with the ERC for the exemptions but was told national agencies are still completing paperwork for the approval. These agencies want to ensure that approved rates are not breached with the additional expenses of tapping into new supply sources.

It’s time to review these regulations as they are obtuse.  It’s disheartening to hear local executives lamenting the slow response of the national government as it needs to comply with absurd laws. People are homeless, without food, almost dying due to dire conditions, and yet we insist on following irrational laws.

It’s not the first time we’ve been hit by strong typhoons. Many Filipinos often spend their December dealing with losses brought by weather disturbances.

In the last five years, Filipinos have had to deal with strong typhoons during December. We only have to recall Super Typhoon Nina in 2016, considered as the strongest Christmas Day tropical cyclone world wide dating to1960.  It made its landfall on Christmas day, hitting Catanduanes hardest. Typhoon Nina with International name Typhoon Nock-Ten, displaced some 380,000 individuals and cut power to five entire provinces.

Then there’s Tropical Storm Unman in 2018, the second deadliest weather disaster for that year. This storm hit the Bicol region the hardest and displaced at least 17,000 individuals in the region .

Scientists agree that the world’s weather is becoming more tumultuous with weather disasters taking home livelihoods, homes and lives. Sadly, the Philippines is considered as one of the world’s natural “hot spots” due to its topographical location. Thus, our country suffers more natural hazards than most nations. Filipinos have to endure droughts, landslides, volcanic eruptions, typhoons and floods more than any other country— even during the Christmas season.

There’s nothing much we can do about our location. But what we can work on is to build our resilience to natural disasters. 

Aside from fixing the bureaucratic issues and regulations, we should also work on building resilience to help mitigate the impact of natural disasters. 

As I have been discussing in previous posts, it’s time for us to make big investments in distributed energy resources (DERs). Recently, President Duterte signed Executive Order 156, for a “consistent and reliable electricity service” ordering the Department of Energy (DOE) to identify unviable, unserved, underserved and poorly served areas within the franchise areas of distribution utilities. 

The EO also orders the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) to  “promulgate rules in computing rates that allow full cost recovery for the facilities built by microgrids, [distributed energy resources], and other alternative electric service providers.”

It’s a step in the right direction since many nations are moving towards distributed energy production, recognizing that traditional central power production has its limits and disadvantages.

Centralized power systems characterized by power lines traversing long distances are disastrous during a natural calamity. Damage to a single line can leave hundreds if not thousands of families without power.  Restoration of electricity takes time as the transmission company, distribution companies and electric cooperative have to assess which power lines were affected and damaged, an undertaking that takes time given the size of their service areas. Power restoration after a natural disaster also costs lives.

To increase disaster resilience, we must push for barangay-level microgrid systems, all renewable energy-based. This is already feasible these days given the decreasing costs of technologies both in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and power sectors.  The merging of these two sectors will usher in a new dawn for power consumers. Barangay -level power systems are cheaper in the long run and more resilient. Power restoration after a disaster will be faster with barangay level power systems.

There are also other technological tools we can utilize to increase disaster resilience.  

Currently many areas affected by Typhoon Odette are not only cut off from power supply but also from water supply. There’s this technology I’m now advocating to ensure continuous water supply using renewable energy. It’s a state-of-the-art desalination system running solely on solar power, and can be connected to tier the grid or the combination of solar and grid generator. It  can convert any lake, river, contaminated borehole and even floodwater into safe and clean drinking water. When fitted properly with a solar panel system, these desalination units can operate 24/7.

These are just some of the ways we can increase our resilience against natural disasters. We can take advantage of new advances in technology and our abundance in natural resources to mitigate the effects of natural disasters. We should also review our laws as they hinder disaster response.

It is very heartbreaking to see our countrymen begging for roofs, water, power and  food after losing their loved ones, their homes and livelihoods. Filipinos are naturally resilient and have a strong bayanihan spirit. But much like what many are saying, we shouldn’t rely solely on Filipino resilience but we should instead build more resilient communities. As we usher in a new year, it is my hope that we can find ways to build and support hazard mitigation and ensure proper and quick disaster response.

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL!

Empty Gestures

40 countries signed to stay away from coal during COP26. The Philippines, however refrained from promising to phase out coal-fired plants. Photo c/o Rappler

During the UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), in Glasgow, Scotland, 40 countries signed to stay away from dirty coal.

However, local reports noted that the Philippines refrained from committing to phase out coal-fired power plants.

The agreement had four goals. The first is to rapidly scale the deployment of clean power generation. Second is to phase out coal power by 2030 for advanced economies and 2040 for the rest of the world. The third is to end all investments in new coal power generation both domestically and internally. Fourth is to make a just transition that benefits communities and workers.

However, as reports stressed not all signatories committed to all of the four mentioned goals. Our Energy Secretary who signed on behalf of the Philippines only endorsed goals/clauses one and four. 

A report by Manila Bulletin on this issue said that the Energy Department’s formal correspondence to the chargé d’affaires at the British Embassy-Manila, who solicited the Philippine’s support to the “Global Coal to Clean Power Transition Statement”, only said that the country only supported calls for an energy transition that will primarily be driven by more renewable energy installation and addition of energy efficiency technologies.

The said correspondence was notably silent on whether the Philippines will pull the plug on coal-fired power generation. The letter of the energy secretary instead demanded that climate justice from industrialized countries that are spewing higher scale carbon emissions. “We would like to reiterate the energy sector’s call for climate justice given that the Philippines is not a major emitter of greenhouse gases (GHG) but bear the worsening impacts of climate change,” Energy Alfonso Cusi in the letter said.

He also stressed that the country’s foremost agenda is energy security since “energy transition comes as a means to improve the lives of our people and for our country’s economic development.”

Perhaps, we should not be surprised at our government’s lack of commitment to phasing out coal completely.

During the forum on national energy security sponsored by UP Vanguard Inc. last October, most of the panelists agreed that it may not be feasible for the Philippines or the rest of the world to completely phase out coal by 2040. Mr. Gil Quinoñes the newly minted CEO of Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago’s primary utility company said that it is more doable to achieve 80% electrification by renewable energy.

However, some of the panelists also slammed the government’s inaction in ensuring swift energy transition. One of our panelists, former Energy Undersecretary Atty. Jay Layug stressed that there has been a major decline in new renewable energy capacity addition in the last five years. He noted that there have only been 800 megawatts (MW) RE new cavity out of the 4930 MW capacity added in the last five years while from years 2010 to 2016, renewables contributed roughly 1,500 MW out of the 5180 MW of the total added capacity.

Atty Layug stressed that the Philippines cannot afford a technology-neutral policy and instead pave the way for a faster transition to clean energy.

To add to these thoughts, it seems to me that the drive for energy security is being used as an excuse for our lack of commitment to adopting more renewable energy in our power mix. Are we really achieving energy security by insisting on our reliance on fossil fuel power?

As I have discussed in a previous post, there are various definitions of energy security. For one, the Internal Energy Agency (IEA) defines energy security as “the uninterrupted availability of energy sources at an affordable price.” I have argued that energy security is difficult to define. However, I can easily tell you is that the Philippines is facing multiple risks when it comes to energy security.

Our reliance on imported coal is a source of insecurity. As I have mentioned, at the beginning of the pandemic my fear was that Indonesia, our major source of coal could close its border, which means we can’t import coal from them. 

Relying on imports also means that consumers are affected by global supply issues and pricing. Currently, oil prices are going up. Data from Energy Department showed that diesel prices have gone by Php18.10 per liter since the start of 2021 So, are we really heading towards energy security when we remain reliant on coal and oil?

If we are to follow IEA’s definition, then we are not achieving energy security as our power rates remain expensive especially when global prices go up.

I agree that we cannot fully phase out coal in the next 20 years, but the government has been quite slow in its push for renewables. This is evidenced by the downward revision of the share of renewables in the Philippine Energy Plan (PEP) 2020-2040. Recently, the Energy Department released its amended PEP 2020- 2020, which set a target of 50% renewable share in the power mix by 2040. In contrast, its previous PEP 2018-2040 set the target to a 54 % share of the power mix.

The Department did not explain why it changed its target. It’s quite baffling especially since it had already declared a moratorium on new coal-fired power plants last year.

Naturally, DOEs lack of commitment to end financing for coal or to end coal during COP 26 has been met with strong criticisms. Greenpeace Philippines Campaigner, Khevin You said that the organization is denouncing in “the strongest possible terms the Philippine government’s shameless climate hypocrisy and its lack of political will to end coal use and chart a decisive path away from dependence on fossil fuels.”

Likewise, the Center for Energy, Ecology and Development (CEED) said the government’s commitments are just an “empty gesture.” 

I again go back to what our panelists said in the UPVI forum. We have enough laws and we are not running of ideas on how fast we can transition to renewable energy but what we need is consistency in policy enforcement. We need political will and decisiveness in implementing laws. We need strong leadership to ensure a fast clean energy transition. Indeed, we don’t need empty gestures.

Leadership is What We Need: UPVI’s webinar on National Energy Security

Last October 19, UP Vanguard Incorporated (UPVI) with SMC Global Power as a major sponsor, conducted a public webinar entitled “National Energy Security: Reliability and Resiliency in the New Normal”.

We had been fortunate to have a distinguished panel consisting of two former Energy Secretaries, namely Dr. Francisco Viray and Atty. Raphael Lotilla, and outgoing Chief Executive Officer of New York Power Authority, Mr. Gil Quinoñes. The forum was moderated by Atty. Mike Toledo, Director for Government Relations and Public Affairs of Metro Pacific Investment Corporation.

One of the main discussion points in the forum was the transition to clean energy. Panelists and reactors agree that the transition to a carbon-free environment is inevitable. Under the COP 21 Paris Agreement in 2015, countries should aim to limit global warming to preferably 1.5 degrees celsius compared to the pre-industrial level. 

Dr. Viray pointed out that the International Energy Agency has recommended the complete phase-out of all unabated coal and oil power plants by 2040 to reach net-zero global energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by 2050.

He, however, sees three issues in the clean energy transition for the Philippines.

First, is that the mismatch in clean energy investments for whatever reason can impact energy security and price volatility. Second, the availability of cost of non-greenhouse gas emitting technology sharing the same characteristics of fossil fuel-fired plants and balancing the need for VRE sources may be subject to geopolitical challenges as the Philippines will just have to sit and wait on the technology made available by advanced countries. Third, he asked who bears the costs of the energy transition, especially the replacement of capacity generated by fossil fuel plants.

For his part, Atty. Raphael Lotilla said that the transition will not happen overnight and that it must be managed well. The pace of the energy transition will vary from one country to another but the end game is the same: a carbon-free environment.

He raised two points on how the Philippines can manage the clean transition properly. 

First, he noted that the upstream natural gas and petroleum industry sector has a major role to play in the Philippines’ clean energy transition and energy security. Atty. Lotilla stressed that the country needs to provide investors with clear regulatory policies.

He cited the case of the Malampaya gas field’s tax issue where the Commission on Audit’s 2011 decision reversing the rule that the government will assume corporate income tax has caused major uncertainty among investors. The potential investors, he added, need more clarity and certainty before they shell out money for exploration and development work in other service contracts.

One of the reactors, UP Vanguard, Engineer Ray Apostol who is a long-time professional in exploration work, cited alarming statistics on the present administration’s lack of exploration activities.

Mr. Apostol noted that the Philippines is at the bottom among ASEAN countries when it comes to gas exploration. He stressed that there has been no exploration well drilled in the last five and half years. Mr. Apostol recommended that the government should ramp up support for exploration activities and carefully review the bidding process and exploration contracts. Likewise, the government should opt for non-exclusive exploration activities.

There is also a consensus that renewable energy is clearly the way forward for the Philippines. According to Dr. Viray, achieving energy security requires more development of renewables but, unfortunately, our country has no full control to harness and exploit these resources.

Atty. Lotilla stressed that we must allow more foreign investors so we can develop renewable energy sources in the country. He said that the provision in the constitution referring to foreign ownership that should be limited to 40 percent should only be interpreted for finite resources. The constitution talks about “potential energy” and thus must exclude solar and wind as they can be converted immediately to electricity.

One of the reactors, former Energy Undersecretary, Atty. Jay Layug echoed Atty. Lotilla’s point of allowing more foreign investors in the renewable energy sector. 

He lamented the fact that the Philippines imported more oil and coal in the last five years as renewables only accounted for 800 megawatts (MW) out of the 4930 MW capacity added in the last five years. In contrast, from years 2010 to 2016, renewables accounted for 1,500 MW out of the 5180 MW total added capacity.

Atty. Layug stressed that the government cannot afford to adopt a technology-neutral policy. It must instead step up and be an enabler to ensure that the Philippines become more dependent on renewables instead of imported fossil fuels. He added that the country has too many laws but the problem lies with implementation, adding that the National Renewable Energy program is a “bible” that the government must follow.

For his part, Mr. Gil Quinoñes said that it may not be feasible to be 100 percent coal-free by 2050 but what is more doable is for the world to achieve 80 percent electrification from renewables.

He added that clean energy transition may be expensive but the climate crisis requires that problems be addressed as fast as possible.

Mr. Quinoñes stressed that richer countries should advance clean energy technologies that can be adopted by emerging markets like the Philippines.

Another reactor, Bill Lenihan, CEO of ZOLA Electric, a company that offers power solutions in Africa, noted that a centralized grid system won’t solve the emerging markets’ problems. He added that distributed energy and micro grid adaptation in the Philippines will differ from the ways the US and other richer countries have developed these technologies. 

For example, in the United States, micro grids are necessary backups but they can afford to have them as mere backups as they have well-developed grids. On the other hand, the Philippines will need to make distributed energy resources (DERs) and microgrids as the primary source of power in many areas of the country.

In the end, Dr. Viray summed up the Philippines energy security problem best when he said that “We are not lacking in ideas and laws. What we need is to synchronize… Leadership is what we need.”

What 2020 Taught Us

Image c/o https://www.sdmmag.com/


To say that the year 2020 was tough is an understatement. But the COVID-19 pandemic along with natural disasters we experienced in the Philippines in the last quarter of the year, have taught as many valuable lessons.

For one, the community quarantine imposed by the government exposed the vulnerabilities of the energy sector. 

The report by the Institute For Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEFAA) showed the downside of our inflexible coal baseload plants and long-term guaranteed contracts. 

The study entitled “Philippines Power Sector Can Reach Resilience by 2021” noted that the depressed demand for power due to the lockdown forced coal plants to turn to mid-merit load factor. This in turn increased the power cost per kilowatt-hour. The pass-on provisions of our Power Sales Agreements (PSA) that allow cost recovery for the independent power producers ensured that the higher costs are shouldered by consumers.

Our penchant for large volumes of baseload capacity running on imported fuel did not bode well for us given that 80% of baseload coal plants are inflexible. This means that fuel and other variable expenses in running power plants remained flat regardless of power demand. We may have experienced a depressed demand during the Enhanced Community Quarantine but plants had to run at their minimum operating levels.

The study, released in June, estimated that power consumers could be paying PHP9.679 billion more in power rates if energy sales volume decline by 10% in 2020. 

These illustrate what I have been pointing out as the downside of not having fixed-price contracts and our over-reliance on coal-fired plants. This pandemic served as a wake-up call to fix the problems of the sector for the benefit of consumers

On top of the prolonged lockdown and the ensuing community quarantines, the Filipinos unfortunately also had to deal with natural disasters in the last quarter of 2020. Typhoon Goni, referred to as Super Typhoon Rolly in the Philippines, caused heavy rainfall, landslides, and flooding in Luzon. The super typhoon, considered the strongest landfalling typhoon in the world for 2020 left massive destruction in Luzon especially in Albay, Catanduanes, Camarines Sur, and Quezon. 

Estimates showed that Super typhoon Rolly’s damage to infrastructure reached Php 11.3 billion, causing massive livelihood loss as battered areas rely heavily on the agriculture sector.

As if that wasn’t enough, less than two weeks after Rolly’s devastation, the Philippines was once again battered by Typhoon Vamco. Locally known as Ulysses, this typhoon triggered extensive flooding in many areas like Metro Manila, Rizal, Cagayan Valley and Isabella. Estimates show that its damages are around Php 20 billion, surpassing the damages caused by Typhoon Rolly.

These two typhoons are not the only ones to hit the country last quarter of the year. There were five in total in October and November, costing the Philippine economy Php90 billion in lost output. Plus, there was tropical depression Krovanh, or locally known as Vicky, which claimed lives and caused floods in some parts of CARAGA region just before Christmas.

These weather disturbances are due to the undeniable climate crisis. Our country, unfortunately, is among those most affected by natural disasters exacerbated by climate change, despite our meager contribution to the world’s carbon footprint.

Thus, it is imperative for us to also move fast in implementing effective mitigation. The wide adoption of renewable energy is one of the most effective climate change mitigation actions.

In the words of Finance Secretary Sonny Dominguez, “Severe weather events inflict human, social, and economic costs on the Filipino people. We lose billions every year in damage to crops and infrastructure. These mounting losses dampen our overall economic progress. These costs will continue to accumulate unless we move fast on mitigation measures.”

The need for a swifter shift to more renewable energy use is more emphasized than ever. We may have been survivors of many weather disturbances and natural disasters but this pandemic should fuel action for faster mitigation measures. More so since experts have pointed out that climate change contributes to pandemics. 

We may have experienced some of the worst times, but there are still great lessons and developments to be thankful for.

For one, this pandemic has also accelerated the use of digital technologies locally. 

For example, more payment options now available allow customers to settle bills more conveniently, to avoid crowding in distribution utilities and coops’ offices and there will be more seamless and contactless payment options coming soon. Other technologies soon to be available are contactless meter application and remote reading, activation, and deactivation of power supply, to name a few.

There’s also the announcement of the Department of Energy of the moratorium on approval of new coal contracts. This announcement came as a surprise since the department had been insisting on its technology-neutral stand. 

For years, the Philippines has been lagging in its commitment to shift to renewable energy development. The country may have once been a leader in RE development having passed the RE law, but later failed to advance in renewable energy development.

Following DOE’s announcement is Yuchengco-led Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation (RCBC) surprising declaration that it will stop financing new coal coal-fired power projects in the Philippines. Now RCBC joins the ranks of Citigroup, Mizuho Financial Group, and Japan’s Sumitomo Banking Corporation banks that have already made the same move.

RCBC President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Eugene Acevedo made it clear that the bank will shift funding to renewables and gas-fired power facilities. “I’m going to say that moving forward, all our loans for energy projects will be non-coal, it will be 100 percent non-coal.”

It’s a statement that’s highly similar to the strategy of Finance Chief, Sonny Dominguez “Our rule should be simple: projects that are not green and sustainable should not see the light of day.” 

Shying away from financing coal-projects makes financial sense as renewable energy technology prices have been falling in recent years. According to Carbon Tracker, soon it will be cheaper for Southeast Asian countries to build renewable energy plants than continue using existing coal-fired plants. Coal plants run the risk of becoming stranded assets, which eventually will drain resources.

We may have limited control over the many unfortunate events that unfolded this year. But we do have the power to act by learning from them and ensuring that we do things better. Fortunately, recent developments give hope that indeed we are using crises as opportunities to make better policies and programs that are more responsive to modern times.

As We Plan for Economic Recovery

The energy sector should also be overhauled to support government efforts to rebuild the economy. Image c/o http://www.benzinga.com

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a global recession. Here in the Philippines, the imposed months-long lockdown caused our economy to contract as much as 16.5 percent in the second quarter of 2020. Economists predict that the Philippine economy will likely experience an 8 percent negative growth for 2020.

Our government is banking on its flagship infrastructure program, “Build, Build, Build” to revive our battered economy. It has allocated P1.1 trillion, equivalent to 5.4 percent of our gross domestic product (GDP) to infrastructure projects in 2021.

For the power sector, this means higher demand for electricity as we as build more roads, bridges, ports, railways stations, and airports.

As we start planning for the Philippines’ economic recovery we should also overhaul our energy sector now so we can support our government’s effort to rebuild our economy. We need to address the short-term and long-term price stability so we can meet the demand for more power at cheaper prices.

The Philippine Peso has been touted as the best performing currency in Asia, strengthening 4% against the United States dollar. We can take advantage of the Peso’s strength by purchasing all imported fuel that’s oil-based or indexed to global prices while the Peso is strong. Let us remember that our fossil fuels are based on the U.S. dollar and indexed to global prices, and we have plenty of power plants that are importing coal and oil.

I have always talked about how a weak peso and increasing fuel costs hurt Filipino consumers because our Purchase Sales Agreements (PSAs) have pass-through provisions in previous posts. Consumers end up paying more for a weaker peso and more expensive imports. But a strong peso against the dollar can be used to our advantage as we can now use them to lower electricity prices for the next few years.

The government can order all power plants to buy all their fuel requirements in advance. Doing so will place a cap at fuel prices at today’s prevailing prices and foreign exchange rates. Power plants can buy years worth of their fossil fuel requirements so they can fix their prices at a rate that’s advantageous for their consumers.

This is a short-term solution. To ensure stable prices in the years ahead, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) should require a higher level of fixed-price contracts. I’ve been advocating for fixed-priced PSAs since the pass-on provisions always burden the consumers when the peso is weak and the global fossil fuel prices increase.

Likewise, the government can also order the off-takers of the Malampaya gas to purchase either part or all of the remaining gas so the prices of power will be pegged at current prices and present forex rates. The reasons are the same as my first suggestion for buying fuel requirements in advance. After all, the Malampaya gas is also based on prevailing forex and oil prices. 

One might argue that distribution utilities may not have enough funding to import fossil fuels and or purchase the Malampaya gas. However, we have our government banks, Land Bank and Development Bank of the Philippines that can lead a consortium of local banks to help purchase fossil fuels in advance.

Pegging fossil fuels at current global prices and forex rates will directly impact households and micro, small, medium enterprises (MSMEs) as they will be paying less for electricity. This is especially beneficial now as most Filipinos have less money to spend due to the economic recession. Taking away uncertainty is always a good option – it is valuable.

And to ensure long-term stable energy prices, our government should allow competition at the power distribution level. We have the Electric Power Industry Reform Act or EPIRA but there’s little competition still. In the past we thought that the wires business is a “natural” monopoly.  Latest developments in technology is showing that it ism not.  There are even non-wire alternatives (NWA) to power distribution.

 Currently, the the thinking is that two or more franchise holders for the same area is harmful. This policy, however, results in a monopoly, which does not benefit consumers. A monopoly doesn’t give the franchise holder any incentive to constantly innovate and improve its services.  Allowing more players will push utility companies to provide better services at cheaper rates to consumers. There are ways to improve the service to consumers through competition.

A clear definition of a load profile will also benefit us all in the long-run. Currently, our current procurement rules do not result in an efficient deployment of our energy resources because the ERC focuses on individual contracts. Consumers are paying more for power because we are not deploying power cost-effectively.

Coal-fired power, which is best used for baseload power is also being used for mid-merit power, thus whatever cost advantage of coal goes away. This happens because current procurement rules do not require ECs or DUS to differentiate the different power requirements. We need to define a load profile and regulate the appropriate levels of baseload, mid-merit, and peaking. The DOE and ERC can work on the limits and ensure that these are reflected in PSAs. The ERC should reject contracts that fall outside these limits. The recent announcement of DOE that there will be a moratorium in the issuance of permits for coal-firepower plants is a step in the right direction.

Reviving our economy requires the cooperation of all. For the power sector, this means ensuring sustainable and affordable electricity. More so since according to the Philippine Energy Plan 2018 to 2040 draft, local electricity demand is set to increase by an average of 6.7% annually. We can only meet this demand while making power rates cheaper by fixing the ills of our sector now.

Energy Transformation is What We Need

Sydney is powered by 100% renewable energy. Photo c/o https://www.energymatters.com

There’s been some good news on the renewable energy sector in recent months.

For one,  the City of Sydney, the biggest city in Australia, recently announced that is now powered by 100% renewable energy. This means that all public operations such as sports facilities, street lights, buildings, and the historic town hall in the city that’s home to 250,000 residents are running on clean energy starting July 1. The feat was made possible by a power purchase agreement (PPA) valued at $60 million, saving the city roughly half a million dollars annually over the next 10 years.

 Plus, there’s the United Kingdom (UK), which was able to generate almost half of its power needs from renewables in the first quarter of the year. The UK government data showed that renewable power made up 47% of the country’s electricity in the first three months of the year, breaking the previous set quarterly record of 39% in 2019. The substantial increase in the total renewable output of the UK was primarily driven by growth in power generated by wind farms and solar panels.

And RE sector’s record in the UK is likely to be broken in the coming years with the government’s plan for “a massive expansion of renewables as part of the UK’s green economic recovery” says Rebecca Williams, policy manager of RenwableUK, a non-profit renewable energy trade association.

Meanwhile, in the Philippines, the National Renewable Energy Board (NREB), recently reported that the renewable energy share in the power supply mix keeps on “dwindling.”

In 2015, renewable’s contribution to the supply generation mix was around 25%. RE’s share was even lower for 2016, 2017, and 2018 at 24.21%, 24.57%, and 23.38%, respectively. According to NREB Chairman Monalisa Dimalanta, renewable power’s share in 2019 was even lower at 21%.

In contrast, coal dominated the power mix, recording its highest share in 2018 at 52.05%.

As for the total installed capacity, the Philippines still is far from its target. Dimalanta notes that in 2019, RE capacity was only 5,000 megawatts (MW), more than 10,000 MW short of the 15,304 MW target by 2030.

But perhaps renewables contribution to the Philippines ’ power mix would be better in the following years. Hopefully, the government and the energy planners so engrossed in the faulty appreciation of the least cost method in power planning will finally appreciate what renewable power has to offer.

The COVID-19 has, after all, exposed the vulnerability of our energy sector. For a while, I was worried that Indonesia, the Philippines’ largest source of coal, would close its borders, thus putting our energy source at risk. Even the Energy Secretary has acknowledged that the coronavirus pandemic highlighted the need to ensure energy security by developing our indigenous resources.

Thankfully, the Indonesian government did not close its borders and stop the export of coal. But this pandemic should teach us valuable lessons, pushing us closer to clean energy transition. There’s a strong case for doing so given that experts have been saying that now is the best time to ramp up renewable energy development both locally and around the world.

For example, a policy paper, titled “Can COVID-19 spark an energy transition in the Philippines?” noted that this pandemic has provided an opportunity for the Philippines to pursue the development of more RE source more aggressively given that the lower coal generation due to the drop in power demand. 

The paper penned by Ateneo de Manila University economics department Associate Professor Majah-Leah Ravago and The University of Hawaii, Manoa economics department Professor Emeritus James Roumasset noted that “the rather dramatic fall in coal-fired generation may afford an opportunity for the Philippines to meet their renewable targets without resorting to costly subsidies.” 

The study noted that power demand dropped by 30% nationwide with coal generation decreasing from 56 to 48 %. On the other hand, generated energy from renewables remained the same with biomass and solar power generation rising slightly during our enhanced community quarantine.

Now is the best time, too to invest more in renewable energy projects says the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in its report “The Post-COVID Recovery.” It noted that the renewable energy sector has proven to be more resilient than other parts of the energy sector given the high shares of renewables continue to operate effectively. “Renewables have proven to be the most resilient energy sources throughout the current crisis. This evidence should allow governments to take immediate investment decisions and policy responses to overcome the crisis,” said Francesco La Camera, Director-General of IRENA.

The IRENA report added that accelerating the energy transition will bring substantial socio-economic benefits, specifically job creation. Aligning immediate stimulus action for the next three years, particularly from 2021 to 2023 and scaling up public and private energy spending to USD 4.5 trillion annually would boost the world economy by an additional 1.3 percent. 

This level of investment would also create 19 million more energy transition-related employment by 2030. Jobs in renewables power would grow to almost 30 million in 2030 from about 12 million in 2017. The study stressed that every one million dollars invested in renewables can provide three times more jobs than in fossil fuels.

I, along with other experts, have been arguing that the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic recession should not deter us from pursuing our clean energy transition goals. Like the experts quoted above, there’s an opportunity and a greater need for us to accelerate our shift to renewable energy.

A fast clean energy transition would reap enormous benefits for all and help in the global economic recovery. It also means ensuring energy security in the Philippines. And in the words of the IRENA President, “Now is the time to invest in a better future. Government policies and investment choices can create the necessary momentum to enact systemic change and deliver the energy transformation away from fossil fuels.”

Ditching the Notion of Least Cost

In a previous post, I have raised the possibility of Indonesia, our biggest source of coal, closing its ports because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Fortunately, this didn’t happen as we would have major problems given that we source 90 percent of our coal from Indonesia.

But this doesn’t mean that we should refrain from overhauling our energy sector. After all, this pandemic has exposed vulnerabilities in our energy sector especially since we are a fossil-reliant power country.

A study by the Institute For Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEFAA) discussed how the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the weaknesses of the power sector. 

The report entitled “Philippines Power Sector Can Reach Resilience by 2021” stressed that our energy market, which relies heavily on fossil fuels because our energy planners prefer the least cost method, has not delivered on its promise of being the cheapest cost of energy. On the contrary, our reliance on large scale fossil fuel plants with guaranteed contracts have resulted in grid inflexibility, and price instability.

The researchers noted that the sector for so long has focused almost exclusively on mobilizing capital for large volumes of baseload capacity that runs on imported fuel. Unfortunately, coal plants are inherently inflexible, and in the Philippines 80% of baseload coal plants are inflexible.

The lockdown, the IEFAA said, has exposed the downside of the guaranteed contracts with coal plants.

According to the authors, with the depressed demand for power, coal plants are turning to their mid-merit load factors, which have a higher per kilowatt-hour rate. This is all thanks to our power sales agreements (PSAs) that ensure capital recovery for coal plants. 

The study pointed out that our PSAs have provision for capacity payments, which is the payment to ensure that the coal investor can recover their capital “it is designed to ensure IPPs can recover their capital costs and repay their loans on a timely basis. This means that neither the financial sector nor the power sector is liable for the risk they take, as these are passed on to end-users who are ill-equipped to manage such risk.”

And with the depressed demand for power, coal plants are turning to their mid-merit load factors, which in turn increases the cost per kilowatt-hour. Thus, Filipino consumers have to pay more for every kilowatt-hour, thanks to the pass-on cost provisions of the PSAs.

By just how much will consumers have to shoulder for these capacity payments? According to the study, if there is a 10% decline in energy sales volume for 2020 and if power comes from fossil plant with the usual PSA with the capacity payments clause, then end-users will have to fork out PHP9.679 billion (USD 193.573 million) in 2020. Now, that’s a lot.

All this could have been avoided if we had fixed-term contracts where our consumers will pay the same price regardless of the power demand. As I have been saying in the past, these pass-on provisions burden the consumers. I have been proposing for fixed-price contracts to protect consumers. This is the same recommendation of IEEFA of making fixed cost procurement.

Looking at our PSAs will help us understand what we are doing wrong in the energy sector. Having fixed-price long terms contracts will reduce our power rates regardless of technology. And as I have pointed out in previous blog posts, our PSAs are similar to asking Juan deal Cruz to shoulder the risks through the pass on costs, because our energy planners have a faulty appreciation of the least cost. But in reality and as IEEFA has stressed, big-scale fossil fuel plants have not delivered the least cost system but rather caused price instability.

Our least-cost approach has been faulty as we only base our decisions on the cheapest energy to generate by comparing technologies and choosing which sources are ‘cheaper’ than others. We exacerbate the problem by regulating the costs that can be passed on to Juan deal Cruz according to the returns we feel are owed to the investors rather than what consumers deserve.

The IEEFA study emphasized that the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for the market to turn to more flexible dispatch strategies especially because of the dramatic drop in demand during the lockdown months. It is recommending for the Department of Energy to start pushing for grid flexibility, modular system, a moratorium on new inflexible power, and for the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) to remove pass-through cost provisions and carve out curtailments for inflexible plants.

I would add further to these recommendations. As the government orders the immediate development of indigenous sources, our procurement rules should also change as the present rules for evaluating PSAs do not differentiate indigenous and imported energy. Thus, ERC should require distribution utilities to testify during procurement that there are no indigenous resources in the franchise area or that there are no offers from indigenous power producers.

It makes a lot of sense to recommend grid flexibility, modular dispatch, and grid upgrades via the inclusion of more renewable energy. This is nothing new. Renewable energy, after all, offers flexibility to a power system as they are capable of rapid start-up and dispatching adjustable capacity.

Plus, the prices of renewable technologies have been falling in the last few years. IEEFA noted that “The deflationary price trajectory of renewable electricity generation and storage triumphs over the cost of generating and moving electricity from a large fossil-fueled power plant.”  We can also have a fixed price for power sourced from indigenous materials. 

The IEEFA said it best when it noted that “Power sector planners assumed that a large system lock-in such as coal would lead to the least-cost system. Unfortunately, this lock-in for countries that import coal has led to inflexibility, price instability, and high prices.” And as we rebuild our economy, let us build better by addressing the ills in the energy sector. We can start by ditching the notion of least cost where we forget about the risks and only look at the upfront cost.

It bodes well for us to make a swifter transition to renewables. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has paralyzed most economic activities. By now we should be working double hard to revive our economy. We can start by addressing the high power rates in our country by replacing traditional sources of power with renewable energy to support businesses as they recover. The construction of renewable power plants will also provide more jobs for Filipinos, too.

When Private Sector Efforts Aren’t Enough

Recently, tech giant, Amazon announced three renewable energy projects totaling 265 megawatts (MW) that would provide power to its data centers. The tech giant said these new projects are all part of Amazon’s efforts to power 100% of its operations via renewable energy.

The three projects consist of a wind farm with a maximum capacity of 50 MW in Scotland, and two solar projects with 215 MW capacity in North Carolina and Virginia. All three projects are expected to start generating power by 2021.

Amazon’s new renewable energy is all part of the company’s commitment to helping the environment. “We are committed to minimizing our carbon emissions and reaching 80% renewable energy use across the company by 2024,” Amazon’s Director of Sustainability Kara Hurst said.

Amazon is not the lone global brand to make headlines recently for its commitment to renewable energy. Likewise, The Estée Lauder Group announced that it has already reached 100% in renewable power in the United States and Canada ahead of its target date. The brand also announced that it has signed a virtual power purchase agreement (VPPA) for wind energy. This makes the Estée Lauder Companies Inc the first prestige beauty firm to execute a VPPA.

Under the signed VPPA, the beauty company will purchase power 22 MW from the Ponderosa wind farm in Beaver County, Oklahoma owned by NextEra Energy Resource. The company says this new development is a great addition to its renewable portfolio “We’re so pleased to meet our 2020 RE100 commitment for North America early. Projects like the Ponderosa wind farm and others in our Net Zero portfolio are all significant achievements toward our commitments to address climate change,” said Nancy Mahon, Senior Vice President, Global Corporate Citizenship and Sustainability of The Estée Lauder Companies Inc.

Corporate renewable energy procurement has been aggressive in the last few years as private firms do their best to honor their commitments to zero emissions.

In 2018, corporate renewable energy deals were on a roll as clean energy contracts entered into by corporations more than doubled from 2017. There was a total of 13.4 gigawatts signed by 121 corporations across 21 nations last year.

Corporate renewable energy deals are impressive but are they enough to meet the world’s commitment of net-zero carbon by 2050?

The answer is no, since gas, oil and coal still dominate the energy mix according to Nick Butler, chairman of The Policy Institute at King’s College London and energy commentator for Financial Times. He stressed that in 2018, only $300 billion out to $1.8 trillion in investments in the energy sector went to renewables. The rest of the money went into fossil fuels, particularly gas and oil.

Butler says the established hydrocarbons for energy remain resilient since renewables only supply five percent of the global power demand. Within 10 years, renewable power is only likely to contribute 12 percent to global energy. Coal will continue to dominate in the next few decades.

This is not to say that renewables will never be the primary source of energy. Butler points out that renewables could dominate the world’s power mix but it will take more than 20 years.

The chairman says that the key to a faster energy transition is more involvement from the public sector. So far, return on investments for renewable energy is still far from the returns in oil and gas projects.

Butler proposes the adoption of a mixed economy model where the state will provide long-term capital to balance the low rate of with the value that renewable power brings to the public. He cites the cases of BP, and Equinor, formerly known as Statoil. The latter was put up by the Norwegian government as the state’s oil company and later became a major player in the gas market and the world’s largest oil and gas offshore operator. The company has rebranded into Equinor and now actively investing in solar energy and offshore wind.

For the Philippines, this will require a major shift in its energy policy.  The EPIRA clearly steered the Philippine power sector to more private investments rather than the government. Its intention was to make the power sector “market driven.”  Unfortunately the Philippine energy market is not efficient and still too young to be a reliable indicator of market prices.  Therefore relying on this current market structure will not bring in new renewable energy projects in the scale and speed at which we need to put in place in the country.

There are ways to make the shift possible even under the current EPIRA regime.  The Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) regulation is one way to go albeit its contribution will be very small. The issuance of a tariff policy requiring more stable power rates will help bring this surge in renewable energy investments.  There are other ways.  However, the government must first realize the need for more RE investments.  Otherwise, all its policies and directives will be palliative solutions to what is going to be a major challenge in the country’s energy security situation.

https://www.theclimategroup.org/news/est-e-lauder-companies-inc-achieves-100-renewable-electricity-us-and-canada-ahead-schedule-and

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/11/13/corporate-green-energy-adoption-flourishes/

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/24/amazon-announces-three-new-renewable-energy-projects.html

 

Getting Ready for IoT

The Speedtest Global Index ranked the Philippines 103rd out of 139 surveyed countries in terms of mobile internet speed. Our average internet mobile download speed is 15.06 megabits per seconds (Mbps), which is significantly lower than the global average of 26.12 Mbps Our average is even slower than war-torn Syria which has 19.48 Mbps and Zimbabwe’s 15.2 Mbps

For fixed-line internet, our country was again one of the slowest placing 101 out of 179 countries in the study. While the global average is 57.91, ours was much slower at 19.51. That’s not even half of the speed of the global average.

Just last September, 1-Pacman Rep. Mikee Romero filed a bill in Congress seeking to establish and create a comprehensive broadband control and management framework.

HB 185 or the National Broadband Development Act aims to create more efficient Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and broadband services in the country. The bill seeks to create an integrated policy environment that would lead to a broad market-led development of the ICT enabled services. The bill aims to expand and establish ICT infrastructure to enable the continuity of ICT-broadband based services that can help support the government’s economic objectives.

In the bill’s explanatory note, Rep. Romero says he hopes ” to ensure universal access to quality services, promote the development and widespread use of emerging new ICT technologies, and to ensure the availability and accessibility of services in all areas.”

Of course, it’s embarrassing that the Philippines has one of the slowest internet speeds in the world. We need a stable and reliable internet connection not only because we need to stream in high definition or so that we can enjoy internet-based games.

No, we need a faster and reliable internet connection for economic development. We need this reliable internet so our consumers can have better energy choices and control their consumption. The power sector, after all, is in the cusp if not already in a massive transformation phase with the emergence of renewable energy and storage technologies. Plus, of course, there’s the Internet of Things or IoT.

IoT, in its simplest explanation, is about the connectivity of one device with an on and off switch to the internet or a massive network of connected things. This means that “anything that can be connected, will be connected.”

And as the internet is widely becoming more available, there are more devices produced with Wifi capabilities and built-in sensors. Smartphone penetration is also high as more phone makers are making them affordable. In the energy sector, IoT is revolutionizing every aspect of the power industry including generation, transmission, and distribution.

Just how is IoT changing the energy industry?

For starters, sensors allow for the remote maintenance of the generation, transmission and distribution equipment. There’s the digital twin technology that creates an advanced digital model of an existing piece of equipment. When connected to the physical equipment the digital twin technology can collect data about the equipment’s performance remotely. This also means that such technology will allow virtual troubleshooting and support even in remote areas. Imagine, being able to monitor the performance of our energy equipment in remote and hard to reach areas by simply clicking on mobile phones.

IoT also allows for a more distributed grid. With the growth of home solar panels, both homeowners and businesses are now generating their own power. And generating your own power is not limited to solar technology as there are also some building their small wind turbines.

The smart grid powered by IoT is indeed enabling the distributed energy transformation. And with distributed energy, grid operators can handle the demand changes on their grids. Smart grids let grid operators detect and react to the supply and demand of power remotely. This is all thanks to the fact that they can obtain information in real-time without having to rely on their on-site equipment.

Speaking of grid management, IoT also helps in better grid management as sensors placed in distribution lines and substation generates real-time power consumption data, which helps grid managers make decisions about a variety of things like network configuration, voltage control, and load switching.

IoT

IoT gives empowers consumers. Photo c/o http://www.electricalindia.com

Indeed, there are many benefits that IoT brings in the world of power. But one of the best things about this technology is that it gives more options. Hence, more power at the hands of the consumers.

Running low on budget and need to cut down on household expenses? IoT can help you. This is because of smart devices and smart meters that help customers make informed choices on their power usage.  Imagine having smart devices that can measure the power consumption of each device and appliances that can be installed in homes. Consumers can then use such information to figure out which are power-hungry appliances and optimize their use to save on power costs. 

Clearly, internet connection is changing the way we do things including in the energy sector. As such, our government should find ways to make reliable internet affordable and accessible. Sustainable and affordable power in the Philippines is achievable if we do invest in our ICTs as well.

And its not just about improving internet connectivity in the country. As we move towards a more distributed and more connected electricity system, our Department of ICT and local energy players should start investing time, effort and resources in Critical Information (CIP) standards. CIP is what helps keeps safe smart grids from attacks. It sets out the minimum security requirements for power assets that are critical to a country’s bulk electric system. Naturally, the growth of internet-connected sensors and control systems come with some vulnerabilities.

In the United States, the National Institute of Standards and Technology is on the lookout for vendors that will help in developing solutions to secure the IoT. Our regulations and plans in the future must also figure in cyber protection.

The Department of ICT (DICT) should also go beyond just common towers. It should tap the country’s power transmission and distribution towers and poles for a common fiber optic policy. Today, each telco enters into a Pole Sharing Agreement with power utilities. So we can see not only one fiber optic in our poles, but three or even more. Not only does this make our telco or cable tv services expensive, it also messes up the wires and poles of the utility.

Our government should be rolling out their sleeves and getting ready for work as the world moves towards greater use of ICTs and broadband services. Let’s go beyond simply looking at internet speeds and accessibility and figure out how cutting edge technologies are transforming various sectors including the power sector. We are now moving away from the traditional models of power distribution, generation, and transmission and we need stable internet, increased information security and appropriate regulations so that we can enjoy the benefits of IoT.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/business/2019/09/08/1949856/bill-seeks-faster-internet-connection-philippines

https://www.renewableenergymagazine.com/emily-folk/how-iot-is-transforming-the-energy-industry-20190418

https://www.utilitydive.com/news/security-and-distributed-resources-an-attacker-will-eventually-get-in-s/565966/