The New Age of Grids

The Philippines finally appreciates the value of smart grids.

For starters, the upcoming 200-hectare New Clark City (NCC) located in Clark’s special economic zone will boast of having the first completely smart power grid in the Philippines.  The NCC, after all, is designed to be the country’s first smart, sustainable and disaster-resilient city.

NCC’s owner, the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) already inked a deal with the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium to be the city’s power distributor. This, after the consortium, won the bidding with their proposed tariff bid of Php 0.6188 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The tariff rate is lower than the Php1.25 kWh tariff ceiling set by the BCDA for power distribution.  It is also cheaper than the Php1.24 kWh rate of Mactan Electric, the lowest distribution supply metering tariff under the traditional distribution system.

The smart city will have state-of-the-art facilities on par with other smart cities around the world.  The smart grid in the NCC is seen to have better reliability standards and will allow customers to access real-time information from the distribution utility. Distribution lines will be underground adding to the aesthetics of an environmental-friendly city.

Plus, just recently, the National Electrification Administration (NEA) has announced that it has piloted a smart grid technology aimed at improving the reliability of a Batangas electric cooperative’s distribution system with the help of the Japan International Cooperation Agency. The technology to be used in this pilot is the Distribution Automation System that is expected to improve the distribution system reliability as well as lessen the duration of a power outage. These are all thanks to automation.

NEA says the smart grid technology will hopefully do wonders for the operational efficiency, particularly the reliability of the cooperatives’ system reliability.

Indeed, smart grids are now making their way to the Philippines. And why not when there are so many advantages in investing in modernizing our power distribution system?

For one, smart girds, unlike the traditional grids allows for two-way communication of electricity data thus providing real-time data collection on the power demand and supply during the transmission and distribution.  This means that the electrical grid can respond quickly to changes in the power demand, thanks to the grid’s controls, automation, computation, and equipment. The said cannot be said of the traditional grid that has a one-way interaction during generation and consumption.

smart-grid-Borg-2

Smart grids empowers consumers by providing real-time data on power demand and supply. Photo c/o telecomdrive.com

 

Smart grids also empower consumers by providing them with information on when the power demand is at its lowest or highest. This information allows them to schedule high energy-consuming activities such as ironing or running the washing machine when electricity costs are lowest. Plus, smart grid coverage lets consumers purchase their electricity straight from retail suppliers.

Another benefit of smart grids is its ability to integrate renewable energy into the system.

In the case of the NCC, the BCDA plans to integrate embedded generation that has renewable energy as its primary power source. The city can also source its power from rooftop solar PVs, waste-to-energy and natural gas, among others.

Clearly,  modernizing our power system with the help of smart grids is a great way to move forward. But, of course, regulations must also be updated as we shift to the smart grid.

Currently, the Philippines has no rules concerning smart grids. The Department of Energy has said that a roadmap for smart grids in the country is underway and will be released by the third quarter of this year in the form of a department circular.

Hopefully, this roadmap will be able to address issues regarding the use of smart grids such as smart meter, real-time dynamic pricing, and grid cybersecurity, to name a few. May it will pave the way for the proliferation of smart grids so that Filipino consumers can take advantage of such technological advancements.

Finally, let me say that the advent of smart grids will lead to the integration of ICT and power systems. This will lead further to the development of data centers nationwide, increase in the number of internet exchange servers, and eventually bring down the cost of both power and telecommunication services. The distribution grids that can adapt to these developments will be those that have the 21st technologies at their disposal. This will indeed help spur the development of the country. As I said, however, only competition in the distribution sector can speed this up.

Overtaking Coal

For the first time, renewable energy has generated more electricity than coal in the United States. 

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), renewable power has overtaken coal generation last April by 16 percent. And renewables are expected to dominate the US power mix on May with EIA predicting that clean power will eclipse coal power by an additional 1.4 percent. 

Renewables dominating the energy mix of the United States is not a stroke of luck. In fact, clean power will consistently catch up with coal in the US in the near future says the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA): “Coal’s proponents may dismiss these monthly and quarterly ups and downs in generation share as unimportant, but we believe they are indicative of the fundamental disruption happening across the electric generation sector.”  

The IEEFA also foresees that renewable energy will generate more power consistently this year all the way to 2020 for the US. After all, coal’s share of the overall energy generation has been declining in the past few years from 45 percent in 2010 to 28 percent in 2018. By 2020, coal power is only expected to contribute just 24 percent of the needed power demand for the country.

The US is not the first country to achieve such a feat. Other countries have already managed to generate more power from renewables in the past.  One of the notable examples is Iceland, which produced 97 percent of the country’s household power requirements from wind in 2015. Its neighbor, Denmark also sourced 42 percent of its power from wind turbines in the same year. Similarly, Germany at one point was able to generate 78 percent of the day’s power demands from renewables.

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Germany was able to generate 78 percent of the day’s power demands from renewables at one point. Photo c/o Time.com

The decline of coal power in the US is in sync with the developments in the global energy trends. According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), a third of the world’s installed electricity generation capacity in 2018 was from renewables. This is because 2/3 of the added power capacity last year came from renewable power.

Renewable power’s greater share in many countries’ energy mix only shows that renewables are the key to sustainable future notes IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “The strong growth in 2018 continues the remarkable trend of the last five years, which reflects an ongoing shift towards renewable power as the driver of global energy transformation.”

The shift to renewable power is much needed since experts have warned us that we only have a few years left to mitigate the effects of climate change. The United Nations in its report Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year stressed that the world only has 12 years to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5 °C. Otherwise, we will all suffer the risks of droughts, droughts, extreme heat, and poverty. 

Plus, recently, we were greeted with the news that the Earth’s carbon dioxide level is at an 800,000-year high. Our world has breached 415 part per million sometime this May, a level that has not been seen in millions of years according to data from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California-San Diego.

Taking drastic actions to limit global warming then is imperative for all of us. This means we should be cutting carbon dioxide emissions swiftly by reducing our fossil fuel consumption, the primary producer of greenhouse gasses. Going to renewable power is one of the best ways to decarbonize countries, after all.

Sadly, and as I have been pointing out, the Philippines is nowhere near the accomplishments of other countries when it comes to shifting to greener and cleaner energy.  Clearly, some of the major developers and major international banks have told me that they are no longer allowed to develop and/or finance coal power projects.

According to IRENA, the Philippines, from 2009 to 2018 only increased the share of renewable energy in the total power mix from 4732 to 6482 megawatts(MW) or roughly 37 percent. This growth is significantly less when compared to some of our Southeast Asian neighbors. For example, Vietnam has managed to grow its renewable power capacity from 7323 MW to 18523 MW or almost 153 percent in the same period. Likewise, Thailand has added roughly 152 percent of renewables into its generating capacity from 4130 MW to 10411 MW as well.

Some argue, that the Philippines only has a small contribution to the world’s carbon footprint. This is probably true, but it does not change the fact that the use of coal and fuel for power generation remains as the biggest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the country. However, this is not the only point.  A more important perspective here is the fact that the presence of coal has the tendency of INCREASING power cost.  As I have always argued the volatility of coal prices and the exchange rates contribute greatly to higher power costs.

The Philippine Climate Change Assessment Working Group 3 Report released last year notes that 41.8 percent of GHG emissions of the country comes from coal and fuel used for power generation and continues to grow by 3.7 percent annually. So, yes, there is a need for the Philippines to take drastic steps in decarbonizing our nation. This is feasible only if renewable power dominates our energy mix. And the sooner we act the better for us Filipinos as our country remains one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. 

Many countries are working harder to do share their share for the environment by turning to renewable power. Soon, nations will have more cleaner energy to use as they walk away from coal. The Philippines is nowhere near such a state. Yet, one can remain hopeful that we can soon see our country is also taking the fight against climate change by like other nations by allowing renewable energy to flourish and surpass coal power in the country.

References:

https://qz.com/1610977/solar-wind-plus-other-renewables-beat-coal-for-first-time-in-us/

https://cleantechnica.com/2016/02/04/how-11-countries-are-leading-the-shift-to-renewable-energy/

https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/11/20/18/greenhouse-gas-emission-in-ph-rising-report

IRENA RENEWABLE CAPACITY STATISTICS 2019

Press Release: Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC approved by governments

http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/session48/pr_181008_P48_spm_en.pdf

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/29/business/renewable-energy-coal-solar/index.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnparnell/2019/04/03/one-third-of-worlds-power-plant-capacity-is-now-renewable/#5801d1043064

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2019/05/13/climate-change-co-2-levels-hit-415-parts-per-million-human-first/1186417001/

What Lack of Competition Means

A recent World Bank report says that more competition in the power, transportation, telecommunication can boost economic growth in the Philippines.

According to the study, “Fostering Competition in the Philippines: The Challenge of Restrictive Regulation,” the above-mentioned sectors are crucial in improving job generation and services in the country. Unfortunately, there is limited competition in these sectors.  

When compared to other countries, the Philippines’ economy is more concentrated due to the higher proportion of oligopoly, duopoly, and oligopoly in the market, the report added.  The author of the report and World Bank senior economist, Graciela Miralles Murciego stressed that such market structures have hampered productivity growth in the sectors: “The entry of politically connected companies limited productivity.”

The study also emphasized that restrictive regulations and restrictions such as complex regulatory procedures and barriers to trade and investments including foreign equity investments have constrained the growth of the economy. This in turns led to the high prices of services. It also cited that the limitations on foreign direct investment have stunted the development of infrastructure in the energy sector.

The World Bank is not alone in pointing out that more competition is needed in the energy sector. For example, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology released a paper, Utility of the Future by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which concluded that “the structure of the electricity industry should be carefully re-evaluated to minimize conflict. It is critical to establish a level playing field for the competitive provision of electricity services by traditional generators, network providers, and distributed energy resources.” The report may not be talking about the Philippines directly, but it nevertheless echoes the sentiments of the World Bank.

The MIT study added that there is a need to review electricity markets especially since new technologies can be integrated into the power system. “Wholesale market design should be improved to better integrate distributed resources, reward greater flexibility, and create a level playing field for all technologies.”

I have been vocal about the needed reforms by the power sector so Filipinos can enjoy lower electricity rates. Our rules are skewed to favor the few. 

Take for example the lack of competition in service areas. Currently, another power player is barred from offering its services in an area that is already being served by a distributor. This, in turn, creates a monopoly. And as our economic professor will tell us, monopolistic practices will always put consumers at a disadvantage.

It also does not help that we are not allowing more foreign investments in the power sector. As the World Bank Report stressed, limitations on foreign direct investments have curtailed the growth of energy infrastructure. This is especially true for renewable energy development. 

We have to remember that renewable sources need to be explored (as in the case of geothermal) and plants have to be constructed. These undertakings require new technologies and equipment. Foreign investors can provide these two while we limit the foreign investors’ ownership on the natural resources if they are allowed to do so. This is the best way forward if we are serious in shifting to greater use of cleaner and sustainable energy sources.

Unfortunately, our 1987 constitution limits foreign participation in many industries including power. These provisions, however, are already outdated and needs to be revised. Former National Economic Development Authority chief, Cielito Habito emphasized this need aptly when he said, “The hope is we will be willing to amend economic provisions of the constitution because that is what really is holding us back. It is outdated. Many of the restrictions in foreign advertising, mass media, education, are really out of date. Given the technology in recent years, those rationales don’t apply anymore to the information age.”

Time and time again we are reminded by various experts on the many virtues of competition in various areas including the power sector. But these reminders seem to fall on deaf ears. The Philippines still has one of the highest power rates in Asia, and we all have to thank our regulators and policymakers for that.

References:

https://www.philstar.com/business/2019/03/05/1898614/greater-competition-power-telco-transport-boosts-growth-world-bank#UcJx07M8WylEry0k.99

http://www.bworldonline.com/constitutional-amendments-needed-boost-fdi/

Good and Sad Headlines

 

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Renewable Energy dominated the power mix of Germany in 2018. Photo c/o Time.com

The New Year started with news of record highs for the renewable energy sector.

In Germany, renewable energy dominated the power mix for 2018. A study by Bruno Burger of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems showed that Germany is on its way to becoming less dependent on fossil fuel as renewable energy accounted for 40 percent of the country’s electricity production in 2018 while 38 percent came from coal. This is the first time renewables has overtaken coal as Germany’s primary power source. Wind power also became the second biggest power source.

Similarly, a  new record high in renewable energy use was also recorded last year by the United Kingdom (UK).

According to climate research and news site, Carbon Brief, growth in renewable energy use in the UK rose to 33 percent, a record-breaking figure. On the other hand, fossil fuel use dropped to 46 percent, the lowest ever recorded as many coal power plant closed last year. The UK has earlier pledged to phase out all coal plants by 2025.

These two countries’ achievements only show that indeed a shift to cleaner forms of energy is possible.

Unfortunately, the Philippines has not been making headlines for its use of renewable power.

On the contrary, recent headlines about the energy sector talks about the increase in power rates due to the second tranche of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion or TRAIN law.

The second installment of the law equals an additional excise tax of Php2.00 per liter of diesel and gasoline an added 12 percent value for 2019. The total increase per liter of diesel will be Php2.24. Last year, Php 2.50 taxes were levied on diesel and bunker fuel.

Naturally, the new taxes will have a domino effect on consumer prices, transport fares, and yes, power rates.

No, I am not questioning the merits of our new taxation scheme. I leave that to tax experts and economists. What I am merely pointing out is that the new taxes also increase power rates because of the Philippines’ dependence on traditional sources of power.

Estimates by The Independent Electricity Market Operator of the Philippines (IEMOP) show that the second tranche of TRAIN law will raise electricity prices by P0.1111 per kilowatt hour (kWh). By 2020 or on the third installment, the increase would be P0.1311 per kWh. The first phase already raised electricity prices by P0.0904 per kWh. These estimates according to IEMOP are based on the assumptions of Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) related to its sourcing energy mix.

Naturally, the power rates will increase if fuel prices in the world market increase, too. In the words of IEMOP President Francis Saturnino Juan, “So, these are the incremental amounts, but of course if the price of fuel itself will increase, then that will add to this incremental increase in 2019 and 2020 because of the staggered increase in the implementation of the law,” he said.

The issue of increasing power prices is a separate one from that of volatility. Volatility itself causes over-all costs to rise because of uncertainty. Because we are dependent on global markets, necessarily we are exposed to global price swings.

We could have spared the Filipinos from this additional burden if we increased the share of renewable power in our power mix a long time ago. Why pay more for expensive sources of energy when we could have just harnessed our natural resources well? This is especially true for off-grid islands that are powered on diesel-fired generators. We have to keep in mind that 80 percent of the operating cost of power generation in isolated islands are spent on diesel. And with added taxes on petroleum products, we can expect higher prices of power generation for the off-grid areas.

That’s just the problem with our reliance on traditional sources of energy and the government’s lack of appreciation for renewables — it leaves Filipinos vulnerable to a variety of factors. Sadly, it is the consumers that suffer when there is no political will to push for a greater share of renewable energy.

References:

https://businessmirror.com.ph/after-hurdling-2018s-regulatory-crisis-power-industry-players-are-ready-for-year-of-the-pig/

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/renewable-energy-germany-coal-power-environment-green-solar-wind-a8711176.html

https://www.ft.com/content/ea2feb40-0e8e-11e9-a3aa-118c761d2745

My New Year Wishes

This holiday is the time to reflect on the past year as well hope and pray for a better one. So, while wearing my renewable energy developer hat, let me share my new year wish list.

Top on my agenda for 2018 is the resolution of the ERC issue. Just last month four commissioners were suspended, which left the energy sector in limbo. This means that the sector is left paralyzed and this does not augur well for the New Year. 

Legal experts tell me that the basis for their suspension is skating on a very thin ice. And many are concluding that the move reeks of political vendetta. If these are true, then it is a development that does not bode well for our country. This undermines the very integrity of the regulatory framework and will bring about uncertainties on the security of investments in the sector. And this, obviously, will spell disaster for the entire economy. 

Equally important is for the players in the sector to realize important role of renewable energy (RE) on the economy. Yes, environmental sustainability is a crucial aspect, but using RE has a more significant benefit for households and businesses: the minimization of risk and lowering of power cost. This approach goes beyond the “least-cost” traditional view of energy planning. With the state of geopolitics, energy security and lowering of prices should be on the top agenda of the regulators today. Renewable energy has to be a priority. 

Related to risk minimization is the diversification of energy supply. Coal cannot and should not be relied upon solely for our energy needs. Natural gas has an important role to play in the country. Today, we source over 2,500 MW of our power needs from natural gas.  We cannot expect coal to replace that capacity when Malampaya runs out in seven years; Coal just does not have the physical characteristics intrinsic to natural gas. It is time to seriously consider how to develop Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Unfortunately, a monopsony like MERALCO is not easily swayed to buy such a massive capacity of LNG. It is imperative for our government to be more creative in finding ways to introduce LNG into the country.

The proposal to have an Independent Market Operator (IMO) is long overdue. However, aside from the IMO, we should also have an Independent System Operator (ISO) to ensure complete independence in the dispatch and operations of the power network.

 Finally, the world will be going towards a phase of distributed generation and smart grids. The government must prepare for this by providing robust telecommunication and internet infrastructure since the current internet speed in the country is just unacceptable. Our telecom and internet should be vastly improved.

 Happy New Year, everyone!

A Growing Consensus

There is a growing consensus among energy players and experts around the world that the best path forward to a sustainable energy and clean energy is to combine renewable energy with natural gas. Unless an alternative type of fuel is found, or until battery storage (or similar technologies) become economically feasible, this may be the case.

For one, Royal Dutch Shell, Europe’s biggest energy company is investing heavily in liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants and developing a market for it. Shell currently has various LNG projects scattered in practically every continent.

Now why the massive investment on LNG? According to Maarten Wetselaar, Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s director of integrated gas and new energies, its because “We are deeply convinced that the end-point energy mix that provides cheap, or at least affordable, reliable and clean energy to everybody will consist of renewable power, biofuels, and natural gas.”

He added that that the company will go full speed with investments projects that can produce the cheapest LNG.

As early as 2012, Shell’s CEO, Peter Voser already announced that the firm would invest some $20 billion in the natural gas around the world in the next three years.

Shell isn’t alone in its belief that renewables should be combined with natural gas.

Craig Ivey, president of US Energy firm, Consolidated Edison Inc, stressed that the US shift to RE like wind and solar is feasible if there is greater reliance on natural gas. Consolidated Edison Inc. provides electric service to some 3.3 million customers and gas service to roughly 1.1 million customers in New York City and Westchester County in the US

Ivey added that REs could account for half of New York’s energy needs by 2030 only with the help of natural gas.

But energy company officials are not the only ones to have this conclusion. A study published recently by the National Bureau of Economic Research concluded that natural gas power plants that can fire up quickly must be used to meet the cut emissions and energy stable supply.

Author’s of the study, “Bridging The Gap: Do Fast Reacting Fossil Technologies Facilitate Renewable Energy Diffusion?” stressed that “Renewables and fast-reacting fossil technologies appear as highly complementary and that they should be jointly installed to meet the goals of cutting emissions and ensuring a stable supply.”

I have to agree with these experts as adding more natural gas helps in ensuring a stable energy supply through diversification.

 

Shell LNG

Adding more natural gas to the power mix is key to achieving energy diversification. Photo c/o https://www.green4sea.com

 

According to Andy Stirling, a Professor of Science & Technology Policy at the University of Sussex, there are three basic properties when it comes to diversification: variety, balance and disparity.

In the context of energy systems planning, variety is about the number of energy supply options available. And having more variety of energy types means that there is greater diversity in the system.

On the other hand, balance pertains to the reliance on each option available where the system is considered as more diverse if there is more balance across energy choices while disparity refers to the differences in each option. There is more diversity in the energy supply system when options are more disparate.

This is why we need to make use of various energy types for our energy mix.So far, we depend heavily on coal to meet our ancillary needs. According to the Department of Energy, last year, coal accounted for 48 percent of our energy needs while some 22 percent came from natural gas.

Obviously, our energy supply is far from diverse given the numbers above. This is why we need to develop and increase the share of natural gas in our energy mix. We can lower our reliance on coal, and use more natural gas for our ancillary need as we add more renewable energy mix.

Keep in mind that both wind and solar power are intermittent. Thus, we need to beef up on our ancillary services to maintain the correct direction and flow of power as well as to address the imbalance between the supply and demand on the grid. And for that we can utilize more LNG rather than always turning to traditional power sources for our ancillary needs.

After all, there are advantages in using natural gas. For one, natural gas is three times more useful compared to conventional power. It is highly efficient as around 90 percent of natural gas produced can be converted to useful energy.

Natural gas is less harmful to the environment, too since its main component, methane, results in lesser carbon emission. LNG’s carbon dioxide emissions are 30 percent less than oil and 45 percent lower than other conventional fuels.

Plus, the death print of natural is less than coal according to energy expert James Conca who defined death print as “the number of people killed by one kind of energy or another per kilowatt hour (kWh) produced”. Natural gas death print is 4,000 significantly less than coal’s 100,000.

We have so much to gain by developing our LNG to replace coal-fired plants in the country. Adding more LNG will make our energy supply system become more diverse while helping us achieve our goal of helping the world become a less polluted place.

In the long-term, however, maybe indigenous, sustainable and therefore renewable energy may be the way to go.

References:

http://www.reuters.com/article/usa-property-coned-energy-idUSL1N1IY1DK

https://www.cnbc.com/id/49841864

fuel.https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-06/shell-seeks-to-boost-lng-demand-as-canada-in-mix-for-new-plant

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/08/11/turns-out-wind-and-solar-have-a-secret-friend-natural-gas/?utm_term=.dbf4c1935ceb

https://www.doe.gov.ph/electric-power/2016-philippine-power-situation-report

Diversity and Sustainable Energy Transitions: Multicriteria Diversity Analysis of Electricity Portfolios By Andy Stirling

 

We Pay Higher With A Weaker Peso

pexels-photo-164560

The Philippine Peso has been falling against the greenback in the last few weeks. Tagged by Bloomberg as Asia’s worst performing currency, our currency has lost 1.6 percent this year. Bloomberg also noted that the Philippine peso is also the worst performer among emerging markets, only next to the Argentina Peso.

Both forecasts by DBS Bank and Bloomberg also predict that the exchange rate would be P52 to a dollar by year-end, In fact, according to DBS Bank, the weak peso could continue until middle of next year.

The weakening of the peso is a result of various factors. Unfortunately, a shrinking peso against the dollar is detrimental to normal Filipinos if we are talking about their power rates. The falling peso could spell doom for many Filipinos, mainly because the lower peso would increase power prices.

As I have pointed out in previous posts, our Power Sales Agreements or PSAs have the provision for the pass-on costs where the consumers pay for the foreign exchange and fossil fuel upward price adjustments. To put it simply, the consumers will pay for the weak peso in their electric bills.

Remember December last year where the biggest power distributor announced a P0.1011 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) increase because of the upward adjustment in the generation charge caused by the significant weakening of the peso against the dollar. A news report then noted that the peso slid down to P49.73 in November from P46.59 to a dollar from August of the same year. That’s almost a three peso difference in three months, which resulted in the increased electricity bill. We have to keep in mind that the largest DU in the country sources its electricity from independent power producers, which, unfortunately, have 90 percent of their billings in dollar denomination.

As I have discussed in detail, our energy planners have favored the ‘floating’ PSAs rather than fixed ones, thinking that it is cheaper. To simplify, these floating PSAs are not necessarily more inexpensive as there are unknowns specifically fossil fuel global price spikes and falling value of the peso against the dollar. These unknowns are, sadly, inevitable.

As with our experience last year in the above example, a weaker peso resulted in higher power prices. So, we cannot say that floating PSAs are cheaper because, in the end, the poor consumers will shell out more money when the inevitable happens.

This is why we need the fixed priced contracts. Under fixed priced contracts, consumers will pay the same amount for a specified period, let us say, 25 years, for their electricity. Fixed price contracts eliminate the need for users to pay for the pass-on costs or to simplify, pay for higher power charges when the peso falls against the dollar or when prices of coal or oil in the international market increases. I’m sure our consumers would appreciate knowing how much they would be paying for their energy consumption on a monthly basis rather than be surprised when their electric bills come.

Let us see the economic sense in having fixed price contracts for the sake of the end consumers. Rather than just fret on how a weak peso could hurt us, let us make the adjustments needed to ease the burden for the Filipinos who will shoulder the cost of the falling peso when they for pay their electricity. Surely, Filipinos have other uses for their hard-earned money.