A Stronger Case for Distributed Energy

Apart from disaster resilience, the country will do well in welcoming more distributed energy systems because of other benefits. Photo c/o http://www.advisian.com

Time and time again, thousands of Filipinos are left in the darkness after destructive typhoons hit us.

Just a few weeks ago, Tropical Depression Auring left some residents of Surigao del Norte and Davao Oriental without electricity although the outages didn’t last that long. Auring, after all, was merely classified as a Tropical Depression and didn’t wreck as much havoc as the three typhoons that we experienced last year.

In the last quarter of 2020, Typhoon Quinta, Super Typhoon Rolly, and Typhoon Ulysses battered the country, leaving massive destruction and causing major power outages. The Bicol Region suffered a total power blackout due to these typhoons. 

According to the National Electrification Administration (NEA), the country suffered some Php500 million worth of damages to the utility system because of these three typhoons.

It’s a given that the Philippines will always suffer from catastrophic typhoons given its location. On average, the country is visited by at least 20 typhoons annually, five of which are destructive. We can’t change our location but we can invest in resiliency measures.

 For the Energy Sector, this means revisiting our energy systems, and reinvesting in distributed energy and smart grids

As I have mentioned in a previous post, many countries are already moving away from traditional central power production and are moving toward distributed energy production. The Philippines must follow suit as distributed energy will bring many benefits to Filipinos.

Disaster resilience is one benefit. Our current centralized systems require power lines spanning long distances, which proves detrimental for us when natural disasters happen. Damage to a single line can leave thousands without electricity, which is why it’s hard to restore power immediately. Power distributors, cooperatives, and the transmission company will first have to assess which lines are damaged and affected. Only then can linemen start physically restoring power. Power restoration after a calamity is risky and sometimes results in the deaths of some linemen.

Apart from disaster resilience, the country will do well in welcoming more distributed energy systems because of other benefits.

A recent study in the United States conducted by Vibrant Clean Energy found out that investing in local solar and wind energy, storage, and distributed energy technologies can save the US some $473 billion in power bills from now and year 2050. This amount of savings the research said is feasible if the US invests heavily and uses solar and wind power and distributed energy to power businesses, farms, homes, and schools.

The research also revealed that investments in distributed energy and other technologies that can power 25 percent of US homes are the most efficient way of meeting the country’s climate goals while generating 2 million jobs along the way. And as I have discussed above distributed energy can also help boost the resilience of communities that are dealing with wildly variant weather patterns.

Speaking of farms renewables and distributed energy can also help our agricultural sector.

Recently the Department of Agriculture (DA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that they will jointly undertake pilot renewable energy (RE) projects for the agriculture and fishery sectors in strategic areas of the country. The goal is to promote the use of clean energy in boosting food security. 

Some of the pilot RE projects will include off-grid electrification in corn, rice, and sugar cane farms and the use of solar-powered systems for aquaponics, hydroponics, crop irrigation, and poultry egg incubators and hatchers. The pilot projects will help jumpstart the Renewable Energy Program for the Agriculture and Fishery Sector (REPAFS).

The REPAFS will eventually serve as the blueprint for efficiently and effectively integrating renewables in the agriculture and fishery sector to enhance productivity and ensure sustainability and environmental protection.

The REPAFs will benefit from distributed energy and renewables. Areas that heavily rely on variable energy resources such as wind and solar are better off investing in distributed energy systems as renewable power can be deployed to help balance the grid and improve system reliability.

In this regard we are looking at off-grid solar with battery solutions to be implemented in such areas. One system we are seriously looking into will allow almost a 24-hour electrical source to power  a TV, radio, and a set of lights. And the system will cost below what it currently costs NPC to provide electricity to SPUG areas. We are also exploring collaboration with Land Bank of the Philippines (LBP) to provide the financing needed for the farmers and fishermen.

Distributed energy can also help power rates become more affordable as consumers can sell back power to the grid or receive compensation for allowing the use of their storage systems to help stabilize the grid.

Plus, distributed generation can help breakdown monopolies in power distribution. A study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) entitled, “Utility of the Future” noted that present electricity distribution systems create a natural monopoly as regulators tend to be clueless about the distribution utilities’ managerial inefficiencies and costs. This in turn allows DUs to justify their higher operating and convince regulators to pass the additional costs to consumers.

Distributed energy systems work differently as they bank on other advanced technologies such as advanced metering, energy management systems, and dynamic-based pricing, all of which offer more transparency on pricing.

The transmission and distribution businesses were once conceded as natural monopolies, but technological changes proved that transmission and distribution need not be dominated by a single or few players. 

The transmission and distribution businesses were once conceded as natural monopolies, but technological changes proved that transmission and distribution need not be dominated by a single or few players. Around the world, the energy sector is undergoing massive changes given the many technological advancements and the need to address climate change. It’s high time the Philippines joins other countries that are moving away from centralized distribution as Filipinos will benefit more from distributed energy.

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