Wanted: Fast and Reliable Internet Connection

The Enhanced Community Quarantine or ECQ forced us all to stay indoors. As with the many Filipinos, I stayed inside and worked at home. But work from home means having a slow and unreliable internet connection.

According to Speedtest Global Index, as of February 2020, the Philippines’ mobile, download speed average is 16.66 while upload speed is 6.47 Megabits per second (Mbps). On the other hand, fixed broadband average download speed is31.48 Mbps and upload of 31.42 Mbps.

An internet speed test I did, however, show that my home internet’s download speed was at 1.59 Mbps while upload speed is 11.17 Mbps. I am subscribed and am paying for a plan that’s supposedly up to “100 Mbps”, considered my fast internet that can handle multiple activities online.

Yes, one can argue that with everyone at home there’s heavy usage of the internet. But really, my internet service provider (ISP) seems to be robbing me with my 1.59 and 11. 17 Mbps. My ISP says my subscription is up to 100 Mbps but really, my download speed is just 1.5 percent of what I’m subscribed to. The service I received is even way below than the Philippines’ average. This kind of service is just really absurd.

Clearly, and as everyone knows, we need better internet speed and reliable connection, requiring more investments in IT infrastructure. This isn’t because I simply want to stream in Ultra High Definition for my Netflix, Hulu or Apple TV. We need to invest in our IT infrastructure because our modern world depends on reliable interconnectivity.

In the Energy Sector, high speed and dependable internet is a prerequisite for modernizing the grid.

The Internet of Things or IoT is a game-changer and the internet is the backbone of IoT. Technological advancement has given birth to distributed energy systems, which foregoes the traditional distribution energy of centralized generation and transmission with really long high-powered lines delivering power. Rather, we now have a combined generator and distributor in small and even remote communities.

IoT is needed to empower consumers. There are more choices for everyone if we can leverage on what technology has to offer, allowing even a homemaker to be a generator and distributor at the same time. Imagine a homeowner with solar power or even wind turbines generating excess capacity that can be sold to neighbors.

Speaking of distributed energy, thanks to the internet, grid managers will have visibility over grid functions and performance remotely. Distributions lines and substations are equipped with sensors that can provide real-time data on power consumption helping grid managers make decisions remotely. Even when away from their substations, grid managers can decide real-time on network configuration, load switching, and voltage control, among others.

The Internet allows for virtual troubleshooting, too. We can expect fewer linemen risking their lives trying to fix broken power connections and consumers waiting for days or weeks to get their power back that after a devastating natural disaster.

As for consumers, they now have more information in their hands. With smart devices and meters, they can now know their power consumption and adjust their consumption patterns accordingly. Smart technologies allow them to choose and eventually limit the use power-hungry appliances. Likewise, they can strategize their consumption if they are likely to go over the budget with their power consumption. This is because IoT’s low-powered sensors and internet-connected devices allow for the collection and transmission of data to users quickly.

The case of Chattanooga City in Tennessee illustrates how crucial fast internet is in the modernization of grids and improvement of the community’s economy. In 2008, Chattanooga City rolled out a fiber-optic network that could provide speeds of up to 1000 Mbps. This despite the huge capital needed to install and maintain fiber networks which required new underground wiring and linking to individual homes.

Chatt gridsmart

Chattanooga City is reaping huge benefits from investments in fiber optics and smart grids. Photo c/o http://www.smartgrids.com

Chattanooga’s project was started as the small city wanted to build a “smart” power grid that’s capable of rerouting or switching electricity easily to prevent outages.

The city government opted to operate a city-owned agency, the Electric Power Board (EPB) that would run its own network offering higher-speed service than any private sector players can provide. Naturally, large businesses incapable of providing better service tried to prevent the entry of a new player that would change the competitive landscape. The city government faced lawsuits from US telecom giant, Comcast and local cable operators who tried to block the entry of EPB. But by September 2009, the internet service was already in operation.

A $111 million stimulus grant given to the city by the US Department of Energy saw the completion of the project. EPB managed to roll out its smart grid rapidly. The organization intended to complete the smart grid deployment in 10 years, but only needed three years. “Deploying a network for telecommunications is not fundamentally different from deploying a network for power,” Benoit Felten, a broadband expert with Diffraction Analysis said. “Chattanooga is the prime example of that, and it’s absolutely worked.”

These days, the EPB offers electric, cable, internet and telephone service to the majority of the Hamilton County in Tennessee and eight nearby counties in East Tennessee and Georgia. It manages 3560 miles of transmission line and serves around 178,000 residential and business customers.

Reports say that Chattanooga City is reaping huge benefits from EPB’s investments in fiber optics and smart grids. EPB is credited for being the most influential in Chattanooga’s astonishing economic transformation

The city’s smart grids have helped reduce power outages and incidents in half. This translates to 285 million customer minutes, which means EPB’ customers get to save around $50 million yearly in spoiled food, lower productivity, and other negative impacts.

Chattanooga City’s example shows that there are many benefits to be enjoyed if one invests in a smart grid. The best way to start modernizing the grid is to address the lack of high speed and reliable internet. This is why we need to have better internet services in the country. We need to invest in our internet infrastructure not because we need to stream our entertainment content in Ultra High Definition. But rather because, the Energy Sector needs reliable internet to provide more choices and better services to Filipinos.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s