A New Normal for Power Distribution Companies: Less Face-to-Face with Customers but More Digital Engagement

In my previous blog entries, I have talked about Utilities of the 21st century, discussing how competition among energy players should flourish and how we should move to distributed energy systems. This was before the COVID-19 pandemic happened.

When I entered the power distribution business, my main priority was to provide a customer-centric service, which means ensuring stable energy supply and finding ways to help electricity rates become more affordable. 

According to an article, COVID-19: How Energy & Utility Companies Can Soften the Blow, most Energy and Utility companies usually have set contingency plans in place to address the impact of natural disasters. But no company is fully prepared for the coronavirus. And I agree since this pandemic is a new challenge in the power distribution business as we must craft strategies to ensure our customers and employee’s safety in light of the coronavirus.

The same article said that several measures must be undertaken by energy firms to address the impact of the pandemic. These measures include increasing the digital contact center footprint where companies should beef up on their customer services to allow real-time and two way interactions. Other recommended strategies are offering digital payments and leveraging social media to proactively tackle customer concerns.

Fortunately for us at the power distribution company I’m working with, we already have invested our efforts and resources in technological solutions that will make the lives of our customers easier even before COVID-19. 

In our case, before COVID-19, many customers would pay their power bills in our offices. We have recently added more payment partners. Our recent addition is Xenpay, allowing customers to pay their bills in the sari-sari stores, which minimizes the risk of exposure to the virus given that there’s a sari-sari store practically in every corner in the Philippines. We also have our digital payment channel through G-Cash. Now customers can conveniently settle their bills at the comfort of their homes.

As the article said, there’s a need to ramp up a company’s digital contact center footprint. For us, this means changing customer engagement from face-to-face interactions to social media. This is necessary given experts’ prediction that a vaccine for the coronavirus won’t be available for the next 18 to 24 months. In the meantime, distribution firms should find ways to minimize the need for our customers to go to our offices for official business.

For years now, companies are using social media to reach out to their customers more. But corporate social media accounts should do more than re-post news or carry announcements. While these are useful to customers, social media account should add more value. These days, power distributors must leverage social media more especially since studies show that people are spending more time in their social media accounts while confined at home. A Consumer Welfare Office that engages with consumers via Facebook messaging is useful.

medium.com

By this time, energy and utility firms should be working on additional digital assets to lessen face-to-face interactions with customers in light of the coronavirus pandemic. Photo c/o medium.com

By this time, energy and utility firms should be working on adding to their digital assets that will be utilized for mass knowledge dissemination, necessary to empower our customers. Using customer analytics to proactively identify and address customers’ concerns coursed through social media is a must these days.

Our company is working on an app that will let customers report power outages via social media, which in turn will alert our line-men in real-time, thanks to their GPS-enabled radios. This will allow our linemen to respond quickly to outages.

Relying on social media to minimize in-person interactions makes sense in this digital world. More so for the Philippines since according to a report on social media and digital trends, Filipinos spend an average of nine hours and 45 minutes online per day, making us the most active social media users around the world. This annual study by the creative agency, entitled, entitled Digital 2020, revealed that Filipinos spend an average of three hours and 53 minutes daily on social media.

The energy distribution sector is undergoing a massive transformation, thanks to technology. Before COVID-19, we were absorbed with cutting system losses, studying decentralizing power distribution systems, and technological solutions that will disrupt the sector. Now, we must also prepare for the new normal, a consumer-centric service delivery with limited personal interactions between consumers and power distribution company employees. Fortunately, we have the tools and human resources ready for digital engagement.

 

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