The New Age of Grids

The Philippines finally appreciates the value of smart grids.

For starters, the upcoming 200-hectare New Clark City (NCC) located in Clark’s special economic zone will boast of having the first completely smart power grid in the Philippines.  The NCC, after all, is designed to be the country’s first smart, sustainable and disaster-resilient city.

NCC’s owner, the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) already inked a deal with the Meralco-Marubeni Consortium to be the city’s power distributor. This, after the consortium, won the bidding with their proposed tariff bid of Php 0.6188 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The tariff rate is lower than the Php1.25 kWh tariff ceiling set by the BCDA for power distribution.  It is also cheaper than the Php1.24 kWh rate of Mactan Electric, the lowest distribution supply metering tariff under the traditional distribution system.

The smart city will have state-of-the-art facilities on par with other smart cities around the world.  The smart grid in the NCC is seen to have better reliability standards and will allow customers to access real-time information from the distribution utility. Distribution lines will be underground adding to the aesthetics of an environmental-friendly city.

Plus, just recently, the National Electrification Administration (NEA) has announced that it has piloted a smart grid technology aimed at improving the reliability of a Batangas electric cooperative’s distribution system with the help of the Japan International Cooperation Agency. The technology to be used in this pilot is the Distribution Automation System that is expected to improve the distribution system reliability as well as lessen the duration of a power outage. These are all thanks to automation.

NEA says the smart grid technology will hopefully do wonders for the operational efficiency, particularly the reliability of the cooperatives’ system reliability.

Indeed, smart grids are now making their way to the Philippines. And why not when there are so many advantages in investing in modernizing our power distribution system?

For one, smart girds, unlike the traditional grids allows for two-way communication of electricity data thus providing real-time data collection on the power demand and supply during the transmission and distribution.  This means that the electrical grid can respond quickly to changes in the power demand, thanks to the grid’s controls, automation, computation, and equipment. The said cannot be said of the traditional grid that has a one-way interaction during generation and consumption.

smart-grid-Borg-2

Smart grids empowers consumers by providing real-time data on power demand and supply. Photo c/o telecomdrive.com

 

Smart grids also empower consumers by providing them with information on when the power demand is at its lowest or highest. This information allows them to schedule high energy-consuming activities such as ironing or running the washing machine when electricity costs are lowest. Plus, smart grid coverage lets consumers purchase their electricity straight from retail suppliers.

Another benefit of smart grids is its ability to integrate renewable energy into the system.

In the case of the NCC, the BCDA plans to integrate embedded generation that has renewable energy as its primary power source. The city can also source its power from rooftop solar PVs, waste-to-energy and natural gas, among others.

Clearly,  modernizing our power system with the help of smart grids is a great way to move forward. But, of course, regulations must also be updated as we shift to the smart grid.

Currently, the Philippines has no rules concerning smart grids. The Department of Energy has said that a roadmap for smart grids in the country is underway and will be released by the third quarter of this year in the form of a department circular.

Hopefully, this roadmap will be able to address issues regarding the use of smart grids such as smart meter, real-time dynamic pricing, and grid cybersecurity, to name a few. May it will pave the way for the proliferation of smart grids so that Filipino consumers can take advantage of such technological advancements.

Finally, let me say that the advent of smart grids will lead to the integration of ICT and power systems. This will lead further to the development of data centers nationwide, increase in the number of internet exchange servers, and eventually bring down the cost of both power and telecommunication services. The distribution grids that can adapt to these developments will be those that have the 21st technologies at their disposal. This will indeed help spur the development of the country. As I said, however, only competition in the distribution sector can speed this up.

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