They’re Diversifying And We’re Not

Recently, Petronas, the Malaysian oil and gas company has announced that it will be dabbling in the renewable energy sector. The firm recently announced that it inked a deal with Singapore-based renewable energy firm specializing in solar panels, Amplus Energy Solutions.

Petronas said that its deal with Amplus is part of the firm’s strategy to develop solar power plants and rooftop project. This deal says Petronas CEO Tan Sri Wan Zulkiflee Wan Ariffin is the first step into the firm’s diversification.  “This acquisition reflects Petronas’ strategic intent to grow in the renewable energy space as part of our strategy to step out beyond oil and gas into the new energy business. This also represents our first international solar venture and we look forward to providing energy solutions to our customers in these high-growth energy markets.”

Petronas is not alone in turning to renewable power to serve their customers well and maximize their profits. In fact, many Southeast Asian energy companies that are highly dependent on fossil fuels are also entering the renewable energy market in order to meet the region’s demand for electricity.

For example, Thailand-based energy firm, Banpu sources 90 percent of its revenue from its coal plant, but recently entered the renewable energy market. “We will integrate coal with renewable energy with the aim of maximizing profit and meeting social needs,” Banpu’s CEO Somruedee Chaimongkol says.

Banpu, which operates in several Asian countries as well as the United States has installed some 150,000 Kilowatt hour worth of solar generators. The firm also plans to build 80,000-kilowatts wind farm in Vietnam by 2021.

Likewise, State-backed energy companies in Southeast Asia are adopting the same diversification strategy. For example, Tenaga Nasional, a Malaysia energy firm started the commercial operations of its 50,000 kWh solar power plant near Kuala Lumpur, which is one of the largest solar plants in the country. 

Similarly, Indonesia’s state-run utility PLN is tapping on the country’s geothermal potential by purchasing renewable energy generated by independent geothermal power producers.

Darajat_geothermal_plant_Chevron_Indonesia-1024x682

PLN’s Darajat Unit Geothermal Power Plant. PLN is buying renewable energy from independent power producers. Photo c/o http://www.thinkgeoenergy.com

These companies, which once only had coal in their portfolio are probably now seeing the value of energy diversification. 

In energy systems planning, there are three basic properties of diversifications, namely, balance, variety, and disparity as pointed out by Andy Stirling,  a professor of Science and Technology Policy at the University of Sussex.

Variety pertains to the number of energy supply options available. This is what these companies are aiming for as having varied energy types means more diversity in their portfolio.

On the other hand, balance refers to the reliance on each available energy source option available. This means an energy system is also considered more diverse if there are proportionate dependence on each energy source. Disparity pertains to the differences in each power option.

It’s not only companies that will benefit from having a diversified energy mix. As I keep repeating, nations too will be in an advantageous position if there is diversity in their energy system.

For example, the Philippines relies heavily on coal to meet energy demands. This means our power costs go up when prices of coal in the global market increase. It also does not help when the peso falls against the dollar as we import coal. Whether power consumers will pay higher electricity bills highly depends on world prices and the strength of the peso. And this is all because we source most of our energy needs from coal plants.

We also have to remember that fossil fuels are finite resources. What happens then when these resources are depleted?

This is why we need to diversify our the power mix. This means we should be able to source a majority of our power from sources that are not vulnerable to external factors such as exchange rate and global prices. And again, as I have been saying, renewable energy prices can be fixed for many years. Of course, we also have to prepare for the scenario when finite power sources are low in supply or worse, already gone.

On a side note, many see the Supreme Court decision as challenging the supply of power in the future. I think we should take a step back and think of this as an opportunity to re-think about the energy mix of the country.  We have an opportunity to inject more indigenous and renewable energy in the system. We should grab this chance.

Energy diversification indeed has many virtues. Energy companies with mostly coal power plants in their portfolios are now seeing the value of diversifying their energy sources. Sadly, the same cannot be said about our energy system, our planners and regulators in the country.

References:

https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Environment/Southeast-Asia-s-energy-majors-pivot-sharply-to-green-power2

https://www.power-technology.com/news/petronas-renewable-energy/

Diversity and Sustainable Energy Transitions: Multicriteria Diversity Analysis of Electricity Portfolios By Andy Stirling

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